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  2. BREAKING: Coronavirus Hits 15% Fatality Rate, 83% Infection Rate for Those Exposed; Lancet Publishes Early Study That Points to Alarming Consequences for Humanity The U.S. news media is currently running about one to two days behind the Chinese media in covering the bombshell revelations surrounding the coronavirus pandemic. Natural News has Chinese-speaking investigators on the ground in Taiwan, and they’re scanning the Chinese media for the most important announcements. Earlier today, the Taiwan media began reporting on a new mainland Chinese study that specifically looked at the individuals involved in this Wuhan coronavirus outbreak. We have a partial translation and link below. According to this news, which is widely circulating in the Taiwan press and is based on a study published in The Lancet, the Wuhan coronavirus fatality rate has leaped to 15%, and the infection rate among those exposed is 83%. https://www.naturalnews.com/2020-01-25-coronavirus-hits-15-fatality-rate-83-infection-rate.html
  3. More truth, facts and docs...
  4. Yesterday
  5. Coss

    Any New Jokes

    And life imitates art :: lawn...
  6. Down in a fiery helicopter crash, with his daughter - Kobe Bryant. https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-01-26/aircraft-slams-into-hillside-explodes-in-flames-near-calabasas
  7. couldn't understand it anyway, what was the point they were trying to make?
  8. Cough choke die. As many on this board know and have pointed out, paper face masks are useless.
  9. I see that China has closed down most travel, and that the virus is infectious before symptoms appear...
  10. Coss

    China Thread

    I've been to meetings in Laos where "representatives" of the Govt sat at the back and took notes. As it happened, at one meeting the presenter slapped the Govt for not doing enough for tourism and the whole room, me included stiffened and went silent. (no not the Soi Cowboy stiffening) I don't know, but the world power house thing, might be the shop front, the back might be the same old stinking sewer. Following on from my previous comment, they might not have much of a choice, if the economy goes belly up, can't eat bitcoin.
  11. I remember some wise words spake to me, when I was a teen and questioning why people get up to terrible behaviour, like paedophilia, rape etc. The people at the very top and the people at the very bottom, no longer feel bound by the constraints of society, and do anything they like, because they feel, they will not be held to account or have nothing to lose. I watched this guy, I wouldn't hire him to sell my car. His key point was that Democrats are trying to overturn the 2016 election and remove the orange turd from the 2020 ballot. Some reality: If the Dems were trying to overturn the 2016 election, they would be doing so, you know, saying "we wanna recount, we wanna Hilary, we wanna Judicial review of the results". They are not doing this. The House of Representatives approved articles of impeachment on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress by Donald Trump.
  12. Shocking. Can't be true that Trump lied? No, not him.
  13. Expert: China's animal trade to bring more outbreaks SHANGHAI: The animal-borne Sars virus 17 years ago was supposed to be a wakeup call about consuming wildlife as food, but scientists say China's latest epidemic indicates that the practice remains widespread and a growing risk to human health. Like Sars (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which was traced to bats and civets, the virus that has killed dozens in China and infected almost 2,000 people is believed to have originated in animals trafficked for food. Final findings are yet to be announced, but Chinese health officials believe it came from wildlife sold illegally at a meat market in the central city of Wuhan that offered everything from rats to wolf puppies and giant salamanders. The so-called "bushmeat" trade, plus broader human encroachment on wild habitats, is bringing us into ever-closer contact with animal viruses that can spread rapidly in our uber-connected world, said Peter Daszak, president of EcoHealth Alliance, a global NGO focused on infectious disease prevention. The Global Virome Project, a worldwide effort to increase preparedness for pandemics, which Mr Daszak is a part of, estimates there are 1.7 million undiscovered viruses in wildlife, nearly half of which could be harmful to humans. Mr Daszak said the project's research indicates we can expect around five new animal-borne pathogens to infect humanity each year. "The new normal is that pandemics are going to happen more frequently," he said. "We are making contact with animals that carry these viruses more, and more, and more." Viruses are a natural part of the environment, and not all are the stuff of sci-fi horror. But the recent track record of animal-hosted viruses that "jump" to humans is sobering. Like Sars, which killed hundreds in China and Hong Kong in 2002-03, Ebola also was traced to bats, while HIV has roots in African primates. Today, more than 60% of new emerging human infectious diseases reach us via animals, scientists say. Even familiar menu items like poultry and cattle — whose pathogens we have largely adapted to over millennia — occasionally throw a curveball, like bird flu or mad-cow disease. "For the sake of these wild species' future, and for human health, we need to reduce consumption of these wild animals," said Diana Bell, a wildlife disease and conservation biologist at University of East Anglia who has studied Sars, Ebola and other pathogens. "But, 17 years on [from Sars], apparently that hasn't happened." Wild-meat consumption itself is not necessarily dangerous — most viruses die once their host is killed. But pathogens can jump to humans during the capture, transportation, or slaughter of animals, especially if sanitation is poor or protective equipment not used. On Thursday, the southern province of Guangdong, a centre of rare-species consumption, said it was immediately halting trade in wild animals. Similar promises were made following Sars, yet conservationists say the trade continues, aided by loophole-riddled Chinese laws regarding many species, and episodic or just plain lax enforcement. Chinese authorities have addressed the problem partly by encouraging a farmed-animal industry. This has included for endangered species like tigers, whose parts are prized in China and other Asian countries as aphrodisiacs or for other uses. But that comes with its own downside, by providing a channel for more sought-after wild-caught beasts to be laundered as "farmed," Ms Bell said. She adds that wildlife traders also have become more savvy, avoiding market scrutiny by selling directly to restaurants. 'Difficult to stop' Environmental groups say Chinese demand, fuelled by rising consumer buying power, is the biggest driver of the global bushmeat trade today. Some rare species have been prized in China as delicacies or for unproved health benefits since ancient times. Traditionally, a host gains "face" by serving guests or business partners expensive, hard-to-acquire wild fare. Yang Zhanqiu, a pathogen biologist at Wuhan University, said modern demand also is bolstered by widespread distrust of a Chinese food industry tarnished by years of repeated safety scandals. "People will think: wild is natural, natural is safe," Mr Yang said. "Everyone wants to eat better, so there is a market for wild animals." Mr Daszak said "it's very difficult to stop an activity with 5,000 years of cultural significance." But recent surveys strongly indicate that China's younger generation — swayed partly by animal-rights campaigns involving popular Chinese celebrities — are much less inclined to tuck into bat, rat, or salamander, he added. "I think that in 50 years this will be a thing of the past," Mr Daszak said. "The problem is that we live in such an interconnected world today that any pandemic like this can spread globally in three weeks. "The new normal is that pandemics are going to happen more frequently," he said. "We are making contact with animals that carry these viruses more, and more, and more." Viruses are a natural part of the environment, and not all are the stuff of sci-fi horror. But the recent track record of animal-hosted viruses that "jump" to humans is sobering. Like Sars, which killed hundreds in China and Hong Kong in 2002-03, Ebola also was traced to bats, while HIV has roots in African primates. Today, more than 60% of new emerging human infectious diseases reach us via animals, scientists say. Even familiar menu items like poultry and cattle — whose pathogens we have largely adapted to over millennia — occasionally throw a curveball, like bird flu or mad-cow disease. "For the sake of these wild species' future, and for human health, we need to reduce consumption of these wild animals," said Diana Bell, a wildlife disease and conservation biologist at University of East Anglia who has studied Sars, Ebola and other pathogens. "But, 17 years on [from Sars], apparently that hasn't happened." Wild-meat consumption itself is not necessarily dangerous — most viruses die once their host is killed. But pathogens can jump to humans during the capture, transportation, or slaughter of animals, especially if sanitation is poor or protective equipment not used. On Thursday, the southern province of Guangdong, a centre of rare-species consumption, said it was immediately halting trade in wild animals. Similar promises were made following Sars, yet conservationists say the trade continues, aided by loophole-riddled Chinese laws regarding many species, and episodic or just plain lax enforcement. Chinese authorities have addressed the problem partly by encouraging a farmed-animal industry. This has included for endangered species like tigers, whose parts are prized in China and other Asian countries as aphrodisiacs or for other uses. But that comes with its own downside, by providing a channel for more sought-after wild-caught beasts to be laundered as "farmed," Ms Bell said. She adds that wildlife traders also have become more savvy, avoiding market scrutiny by selling directly to restaurants. 'Difficult to stop' Environmental groups say Chinese demand, fuelled by rising consumer buying power, is the biggest driver of the global bushmeat trade today. Some rare species have been prized in China as delicacies or for unproved health benefits since ancient times. Traditionally, a host gains "face" by serving guests or business partners expensive, hard-to-acquire wild fare. Yang Zhanqiu, a pathogen biologist at Wuhan University, said modern demand also is bolstered by widespread distrust of a Chinese food industry tarnished by years of repeated safety scandals. "People will think: wild is natural, natural is safe," Mr Yang said. "Everyone wants to eat better, so there is a market for wild animals." Mr Daszak said "it's very difficult to stop an activity with 5,000 years of cultural significance." But recent surveys strongly indicate that China's younger generation — swayed partly by animal-rights campaigns involving popular Chinese celebrities — are much less inclined to tuck into bat, rat, or salamander, he added. "I think that in 50 years this will be a thing of the past," Mr Daszak said. "The problem is that we live in such an interconnected world today that any pandemic like this can spread globally in three weeks. https://www.bangkokpost.com/world/1844024/expert-chinas-animal-trade-to-bring-more-outbreaks?fbclid=IwAR0fMCelbjwjtAVWhYn-EGAX8UheZ5cW0mrpXlrmzfwAksHVWQvEx-X9tK4#cxrecs_s
  14. China coronavirus spread is accelerating, Xi Jinping warns The spread of a deadly new virus is accelerating, Chinese President Xi Jinping warned, after holding a special government meeting on the Lunar New Year public holiday. The country is facing a "grave situation" Mr Xi told senior officials. The coronavirus has killed at least 56 people and infected almost 2,000 since its discovery in the city of Wuhan. The US has announced that staff at the Wuhan consulate will be evacuated on a special flight on Tuesday. The State Department said that private Americans most at risk will also be able to board the flight to San Francisco. Meanwhile, UK-based researchers have warned of a real possibility that China will not be able to contain the virus. Travel restrictions have come in place in several affected cities. From Sunday, private vehicles will be banned from central districts of Wuhan, the source of the outbreak. A second emergency hospital is to be built there within weeks to handle 1,300 new patients, and will be finished in half a month, state newspaper the People's Daily said. It is the second such rapid construction project: work on another 1,000-bed hospital has already begun. Specialist military medical teams have also been flown into Hubei province, where Wuhan is located. The urgency reflects concern both within China and elsewhere about the virus which first appeared in December. Lunar New Year celebrations for the year of the rat, which began on Saturday, have been cancelled in many Chinese cities. Across mainland China, travellers are having their temperatures checked for signs of fever, and train stations have been shut in several cities. In Hong Kong, the highest level of emergency has been declared and school holidays extended. Several other nations are each dealing with a handful of cases, with patients being treated in isolation. What is the coronavirus, and what does it do? A coronavirus is a family of viruses which include the common cold. But this virus has never been seen before, so it's been called 2019-nCov, for "novel coronavirus". New viruses can become common in humans after jumping across the species barrier from animals. The Sars [Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome] outbreak of 2003 started in bats and transferred to the civet cat which passed it on to humans. his new virus also causes severe acute respiratory infection. Symptoms seem to start with a fever, followed by a dry cough and then, after a week, lead to shortness of breath and some patients needing hospital treatment. There is no specific cure or vaccine. Coronavirus: How worried should we be? Based on early information, it is believed that only a quarter of infected cases are "severe", and the dead are mostly - though not exclusively - older people, some of whom have pre-existing conditions. The Chinese authorities suspect a seafood market that "conducted illegal transactions of wild animals" was the source of the outbreak. Why is there concern about containing the virus? Scientists at the respected MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis in the UK have warned that it may not be possible to contain the virus to China. They say self-sustaining human-to-human transmission of the coronavirus is the "only plausible explanation" for the scale of the epidemic. Their calculations estimate each infected person is passing it onto, on average, 2.5 other people. The centre praised the efforts of the Chinese authorities, but said transmission of the virus needed to be cut by 60% in order to get on top of the outbreak. This is a massive challenge, the scientists suggest, which will require finding and isolating even patients with only mild symptoms that could easily be confused with other diseases. Elsewhere, a team at Lancaster University have published their estimates of the number of cases suggesting 11,000 have been infected this year. If true, that would be more than Sars. Where has it spread? There are now 1,372 confirmed cases across China, though most are concentrated in those provinces closest to Hubei. But it has also spread abroad - in isolated cases affecting small numbers of patients. On Saturday, Australia confirmed its first four cases - first in Melbourne, and then three more in Sydney. It has also spread to Europe, with three cases confirmed in France. Tests in the UK on 31 people have come back negative, the government has said. Officials are trying to trace around 2,000 people who have recently flown to the UK from Hubei province. The cases largely involve people who had recently travelled from the affected region in China. China's neighbours in the Asia region are on high alert, however, with cases reported in Thailand, Singapore, Japan, Taiwan, Malaysia, Vietnam, South Korea and Nepal. There are also two cases in the United States, including a woman in her 60s who had returned home to Chicago from Wuhan on 13 January. Canada has a "presumptive case" of the virus, but the condition of the person suffering from it is deemed stable, according to a government statement. ... https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-51249208
  15. Meanwhile, back at the Senate ...
  16. Despite research establishing the risks associated with ultra-fine PM2.5 particulate matter, and the fact it is both odourless and invisible, many people fail to appreciate the damaging impact it has on their health, said Khate Sripratak, cardiologist and president of the Chest Disease Institute's medical staff organisation. "It affects the health of people in all walks of life, but children, the elderly and those with congenital diseases are likely to suffer more," he said. Though there are no official figures yet, Dr Khate has noticed a distinct rise in the number of people being admitted in hospital due to PM2.5-related complaints. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), PM2.5 is particulate matter (PM) that is less than 2.5 micrometre (μm) in diameter, or about about 3% of the diameter of a human hair. PM2.5 also comprises ultra-fine particles that have a diameter of less than 0.1μm. PM that is between 0.1μm and 1μm in diameter can stay in the atmosphere for days or weeks and can be subject to long-range transboundary air transport. These ultra-fine dust particles can have short- and long-term effects, such as respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity, aggravation of asthma, respiratory symptoms, greater mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases as well as from lung cancer. Dr Khate also voiced concerns about Thailand's safe standard for PM2.5. WHO stipulates that the presence of PM2.5 per cubic metre (m3) of air cannot exceed 25 microgrammes per cubic metre [µg/m³] on average over 24 hours, and can be no more than 10µg/m³ on an annual average. Thailand's Pollution Control Department (PCD), meanwhile, has set a safe level of 50µg/m³ on average over 24 hours and an average of 25µg/m³ per year. "There's no study showing that Thais have more natural resistance to pollution than other people in the world. The Pollution Control Department should make changes and launch clear measures," he said. He added that he agrees with the government's decision to halt construction, close schools and encourage people to work from home on days when the air pollution is particularly bad. "The severity of the situation was made clear by the sheer number of schools that were forced to close recently," he said. "However, these measures cannot be imposed forever, and it is important that people protect themselves." For those who cannot afford air purifiers and proper N95 masks, using ordinary sanitary face masks is recommended. "Being partially protected is better than not being protected at all," Dr Khate said. Medical staff should wear face masks to boost people's awareness of the need to protect themselves, he said. "If those who are directly involved with health issues do not set an example, people might not take the issue seriously enough," he said. https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/1843849/dont-under-estimate-pm2-5-risk-doctor-says#cxrecs_s
  17. It's not so long ago that the PRC had "domestic passports". A friend taught there in the early 1990s, and he said everyone had to have permission just to visit a neighbouring province, and getting permission was very hard. Also, there were special department stores for the Communist Party members, where they could buy items not available to the ordinary proles. He was one of the very few foreign instructors at a university, and he knew that spies had been planted in all of his classes. He dared not say anything the CP didn't approve of. I image it's about the same in N Korea. p.s. I am totally puzzled by the presence of the U.S. Peace Corps in the PRC. WTF? The Peace Corps was intended to help third world countries, not a world power house like the PRC.
  18. Overall, I'd say the standards for politicians in the U.S. have gone down during my lifetime. Or maybe it's just that the press no longer covers for them the way it used to, at least for the ones they don't agree with. I suspect that there were (but surely no longer are) some films of Epstein's buddies "enjoying themselves" on his private island in the Virgin Islands. That sort of people usually do like to watch tapes of themselves in action. https://globalnews.ca/news/5479663/jeffrey-epstein-caribbean-island/ "Jeffrey Epstein and his close associate ordered a teenage girl to have sex with several high-powered men, including former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson and former Maine Sen. George Mitchell, according to a deposition from the girl released Friday, August 9, 2019. "Sources from NBC News states Virginia Roberts Giuffre, now 36, claimed in the 2016 deposition that Epstein and British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell also directed her to provide sexual services for modeling agent Jean Luc Brunel, money manager Glenn Dubin and the late MIT professor Marvin Minsky — as well as a 'foreign president' and 'a well-known prime minister.'”
  19. Last week
  20. I stopped looking at accuweather a while back but, after this, I'll start following again!!
  21. To use a sports analogy. Schiff hits a homerun if you are American, or he gets a 6 or a even a century if you are from Oz or NZ. It's viral and will help to increase the numbers that will agree on impeachment guilt.
  22. And you have to wonder, if Lev Parnas/Igor Fruman (who Trump doesn't know and has never met...) has tapes of all their interactions with Trump, going back to at least 2018, who are Lev and Igor working for? (Russians? local pizza place?) And if these tapes can surface at an appropriate moment, what else is in the Kompromat library? I'll put $10 on the existence of a piss tape.
  23. and now there's a tape, purportedly from Lev Parnas, purportedly, revealing Trump ordering the firing of Yovanovitch in 2018, before he even knew her name.... et cetera The Whitehouse response? nothing, 0, crickets... edit: Lev Parnas provided the tape, but it was his mate Igor Fruman who made the recording.
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