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mongatu

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About mongatu

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  • Birthday 05/09/1952
  1. I agree with your general point if you are talking about the odds of sleeping with an HIV positive person as opposed to actually becoming infected with HIV. For the odds of the latter I think the calculation would be a bit more complicated because even if a male has unprotected vaginal sex with an HIV positive female, the odds are considerably less than 100% that the male will contract HIV from a single sexual encounter, however, each additional such encounter would obviously increase the odds. (Note: Not advocating having unprotected sex.)
  2. Here's a link to the archived questions & answers by the JH doc. http://qa.hopkins-aids.org/forum/categories.html?section_id=61
  3. Well, the form I had to get a doctor to sign for my retirement visa asked about several medical conditions such as drug addiction, leprosy, elephantitis etc., but HIV/Aids wasn't on the list, last time I applied about a year ago. Got the feeling the form was drafted in the 1800's.
  4. That's why anonymous testing is the way to go in the US. If you find out you're positive anonymously, you can hopefully still get new good insurance and then have a regular test whereby the HIV is officially "discovered" and still be covered. Health care in the US may be advanced but only for those with money or good insurance and good insurance is neither affordable nor easy to come by, except through a good employer. It really sucks for most people, imo. Edited to add: Also people who are old enough to qualify for Medicare also get pretty good health care in the US. I think generally one has to be 65 to get Medicare.
  5. If you are from the US, it actually is not a good idea to get an HIV test from a regular medical provider because such tests are not confidential with respect to your health insurance, or potential future health insurance, which you certainly would want to line up before you go public, so to speak, with positive HIV status. This only applies to backward places like the US that don't have national public health care. Many public health depts or various agencies in the US offer free anonymous HIV testing which is the way for Americans to go, imo, especially if you don't already have good health insurance in place.
  6. Well, that was a great and amusing description and now I know exactly where it is. Thanks for that. Don't know if I'll ever be awake to make it over there during that special "dark vortex" time but I'll certainly remember to at least look it over as I pass by from time to time.
  7. So where exactly is this JP bar?
  8. Are you sure SHE ate a big dinner? Sometimes the ladies don't actually eat that much at one time and make up for it with more frequent feeding.
  9. Says SOONGMAK: I am somewhat dissapointed when it comes to antivirus programs. In the last year, II had three different viruses in my mail, and all of these viruses were brand new - no info was found on the website of different AV software (norton, mcAfee and AVG). What I do to avoid email viruses is everytime I get an attachment to an email that I am not expecting, I save the attachment to my desktop before opening it. I do this even if the attachment comes from someone I know, because most email viruses spread by sending themselves to everyone in the infected person's address book. Once the attachment is saved to the desktop, I right click on it which brings up a menu with the option to "scan (the file) with AVG" (my anti virus software). Using this method, so far AVG has found all the several email viruses I have received to date. Also, AVG posts virus definition updates almost every couple of days, so it is important to use the update feature in the software to frequently check for and install the updates. In case all of the above fails, I maintain a weekly full mirror image back up of my entire hard drive on a separate removable drive.
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