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waerth

Uncle Sam needs you to join the army

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NG, the .243 quite similar really to the 5.56 as the civilian version is a .223 so the .243 not much bigger. I suppose you could use the .243 for foxes but most people in the UK would use a shotgun with SG shot, what I think the yanks call 00? or a .22 rifle. Remembering of course the lack of space in the UK so far fewer places you are able to safely and legally use a full bore high velocity rifle. The .243 popular in England for Roe deer.

Simie.

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I used to have a light weight Parker-Hale .243 deer rifle at one time many years ago. Relatively tiny little bullet but muzzle velocity over 3,000 ft/sec.

What does the M-16 sling the 5.56 out at?

Simie.

 

 

From wiki:

Cartridge 5.56x45mm NATO

Action Gas-operated, rotating bolt

Rate of fire 700-950 round/min cyclic[1]

Muzzle velocity 2,970 ft/s (910 m/s)

Effective range 500 m (550 yd) (I can do lots better!!!)

Feed system 30 round box magazine or other STANAG Magazines.

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How are you doing "lots better"? The 5.56 bullet is so light that it blows all over the place. It took a lot of Kentucky windage just to hit a pop up target on the range with an M16 at 300 meters. Of course, in RVN we never once got to sight in our weapons! (Fortunately, it didn't matter that much the way we were engaged.)

 

 

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I dont doubt it! I love the new m4s. you do have to clean it but I can drop you at 600 meters with out a scope all day long with it.

 

 

The Army wanted to keep the M14. It was that idiot Robert McNamara who insisted on switching to the M16.

 

 

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How are you doing "lots better"? The 5.56 bullet is so light that it blows all over the place. It took a lot of Kentucky windage just to hit a pop up target on the range with an M16 at 300 meters. Of course, in RVN we never once got to sight in our weapons! (Fortunately, it didn't matter that much the way we were engaged.)

 

 

Like much else, all it takes is practice.

 

US Marines all train with the weapon at a max of 500m every year. In fact, Rifle Range is the single longest event in Boot Camp. I have hit targets at 600m often and once had an estimated 750m shot.

 

"Kentucky windage," though still taught, went out with the new easy adjustment knobs on the weapons with the a2 model in the 80s.

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The most the average GI trained at in 1968 was 350 meters. Also, you couldn't tell where your rounds were hitting if you missed. (No spotting scopes!) We just got rushed through training and shipped off to RVN. Same same the Marines ... with boot camp shortened to 9 weeks, then finally 8 weeks. (Army Basic Combat Training was 8 1/2 weeks.) But Marines were better trained at marksmanship, something that we used to bitch about. (If you weren't Army combat arms, you probably had no further weapons training!)

 

You have a very different war from RVN. We were mostly in close range combat - often under 100 meters.

 

The Army really got screwed over by the PC idiots in the 1980s who insisted on "coed" training for recruits! Everything had to be tamed down so the gals could do it. Thank God the USMC hasn't followed suit. Except for combat arms, I don't think the soldiers today are sufficently trained to go into combat. That was all right when armies had front lines and rear areas, but not now. :(

 

 

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