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Ryder

Installing a Thai Safe

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The difference is the key is not a flat one but one of those round types. Are those just as easy to pick?

 

As in a round barrel with dimples on it? Abloy key. Much harder to pick than flat barrel/lockwood type keys.

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The difference is the key is not a flat one but one of those round types. Are those just as easy to pick?

 

As in a round barrel with dimples on it? Abloy key. Much harder to pick than flat barrel/lockwood type keys.

 

 

I think there are master keys for the round keys but I don't think they are readily avialble. As for bump keys, I don't think I have seen them yet for the round keys.

 

Question is: do the Thais know about bump keys? I

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Some on the internet claim abloy locks can be bumped.

 

But if the Thais are not aware of bump keys, then no problem.

 

But I got a feeling Thais do know about them. I haven't seen bump keys for sale in Thailand but doesn't mean they aren't making bump keys themselves.

 

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Just so you know' date=' I could get into that in less then 2 minutes.

 

And I could just take it in less.[/quote']

 

How?

 

Please note, I am not coming down at all on the OP. As he says, it is a pretty cheap thai safe.

 

 

1) I am trained in safe cracking for my job and the one the OP chose opens with a pretty good (and sometimes a pretty soft) rap with a 5lb'er.

 

2) 4" cc bolts tend to pop with about 200lbs force. (Code in the US I think is 6" to 8" bolts. I dont know about GB.) So think a crow bar with you putting a good effort to it. Also, that is for US concrete and not what ever it is they use in LOS.

 

3) As the op says, it is a cheap thai safe. I suspect the crow bat to just the door would do wonders.

 

4) Picking locks is VERY easy once you get the hang of it. See video above. And below... for tubular locks.

 

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Just so you know' date=' I could get into that in less then 2 minutes.

 

And I could just take it in less.[/quote']

 

How?

 

Please note, I am not coming down at all on the OP. As he says, it is a pretty cheap thai safe.

 

 

1) I am trained in safe cracking for my job and the one the OP chose opens with a pretty good (and sometimes a pretty soft) rap with a 5lb'er.

 

2) 4" cc bolts tend to pop with about 200lbs force. (Code in the US I think is 6" to 8" bolts. I dont know about GB.) So think a crow bar with you putting a good effort to it. Also, that is for US concrete and not what ever it is they use in LOS.

 

3) As the op says, it is a cheap thai safe. I suspect the crow bat to just the door would do wonders.

 

4) Picking locks is VERY easy once you get the hang of it. See video above. And below... for tubular locks.

 

 

Do you consider Pilot a cheap safe? It's made in Thailand.

 

The way the door closes, I doubt the door could be broken open with 100 blows from a full size sledge. And by then my whole apartment block would be awake and the police would be there.

 

The cabinet it self cannot be practically opened.

 

Without going into why and what, I think it would be nearly impossible to pry off the wall.

 

Than there's the key lock and digital system. Even if the lock was picked, which I agree can be done by an professional, than there's the digital part.

 

There's other things that I won't disclose but I feel confident about the security of my safe.

 

I'm not arguing but just putting it out there about my Pilot Thai safe and welcome comments.

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Prying off a wall is the easy part. When you insert the crow bar and then jump on it, hang from it, bounce, you are effectively applying 1000lbs of leveraged force per cm2. Not much that size can take this which brings up Archimedes of Syracuse.

 

 

When we hold classes in this, it is amazing how easy it is with limited force. The best for in wall is "in wall" where it is 10 point anchored.

 

90% or more of small safes are stolen kit and kobootle from the residence and then opened at the thief's leisure back at their place.

 

And I have investigated events where Browning gun safes were broken into with basic tools and a little time, but always less than an hour.

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