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Flashermac

Grains Of Salty Truth

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Oxygenated water may not be healthy because germs would multiply at a faster rate in an oxygen enriched environment.

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Unless this device is connected to a tank of o3 (which would be hard with out some other stuff in the tank to keep the ozone ozone as o3 QUICKLY degrades back to simple o2 ) it is not making ozone. Making ozone with electricity at normal pressures either takes some catalysts which are rather expensive and tend to poison you and a LOT of electricity or it can be done with electricity and a shit ton more of current.

 

With out seeing one, I suspect this thing is just making oxygenated water like a fish tank bubbler. Which would be easier to make (and cheaper) by putting your water in a bottle and shaking it a good bit. Either way, a lot of o2, like a lot of co2, in a drink are not really going to do any thing for you but flavor enhancement and make you burp.

 

Wrong, wrong, wrong.

 

Once again, you prove your lack of knowledge.

 

It takes very little electric to make ozone. The O3 will remain in a glass of cold water for about 5 minutes.

 

You use no dangerous chemicals or catalysts. There is nothing to poison you, except your misinformation.

 

They sell a small ozone maker in China Town, at Old Siam for 100 Baht, so inexpensive and works to rid a

room(s) of smell.

 

MAKE A $20 OZONE GENERATOR.

 

 

http://www.bigclive.com/oz.htm

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Wrong, wrong, wrong.

 

Once again, you prove your lack of knowledge.

 

It takes very little electric to make ozone. The O3 will remain in a glass of cold water for about 5 minutes.

 

You use no dangerous chemicals or catalysts. There is nothing to poison you, except your misinformation.

 

They sell a small ozone maker in China Town, at Old Siam for 100 Baht, so inexpensive and works to rid a

room(s) of smell.

 

MAKE A $20 OZONE GENERATOR.

 

 

http://www.bigclive.com/oz.htm

 

Yea right. Your proof that I am wrong is "I bought one in China Town???" Hahahahahahaha!!! Nice! you almost had me going.

 

I love his "proving method" on that link too, "you can smell it!"

 

Cav, I think you need to get a book and try it yourself instead of using Google to look up "home made o3 generator." Build one of these and see how much o3 you get and I will gladly change the process we use to help purify water if you can make enough. But you have to show how you measured it now. None of this "you can smell it" peer reviews, please. Only real science.

 

Good luck..!!!

 

(Or better yet, take the method you were taught in school, read a water chemistry book, do the math, come up with the current you would need. It's really pretty simple to do.)

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...and when I asked you, what school you attended...no reply!

 

I already posted my schools, while you are lacking!!

 

As far as proof, I have no intention of buying instruments to measure ozone, too expensive.

 

On the US Navy ships, we used evaporators to make water. No ozone involved.

 

I mention the ones available in China to show how cheap they are and how they do not use any type of dangerous chemicals or catalysts.

 

You are completely wrong in saying that dangerous chemicals or catalysts are required to make ozone. In a medium voltage electrical station, a faulty set of contacts can produce ozone from the corona. Been there, seen it but that is not proof for you, no matter.

 

You are completely wrong in that large amounts of electrical power are required.

The little DIY link that I posted shows a small transformer on a small circuit board. How much power does that require? very little.

 

Ozone is produced naturally in a thunderstorm.

 

Once again, you prove you are not anything you say you are, a total BS'er. Sorry, you want to run with the big dogs, do a few more decades on Google to get at least some education.

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...and when I asked you, what school you attended...no reply!

 

I already posted my schools, while you are lacking!!

 

As far as proof, I have no intention of buying instruments to measure ozone, too expensive.

 

On the US Navy ships, we used evaporators to make water. No ozone involved.

 

I mention the ones available in China to show how cheap they are and how they do not use any type of dangerous chemicals or catalysts.

 

You are completely wrong in saying that dangerous chemicals or catalysts are required to make ozone. In a medium voltage electrical station, a faulty set of contacts can produce ozone from the corona. Been there, seen it but that is not proof for you, no matter.

 

You are completely wrong in that large amounts of electrical power are required.

The little DIY link that I posted shows a small transformer on a small circuit board. How much power does that require? very little.

 

Ozone is produced naturally in a thunderstorm.

 

Once again, you prove you are not anything you say you are, a total BS'er. Sorry, you want to run with the big dogs, do a few more decades on Google to get at least some education.

 

I think you are mixing what I said with someone else. I totally agree O3 is made in lightening strikes. Volcanos also make it. And any arch flash will generate some. (That goes back to "the massive current" approach, or did you just not read what I wrote...? ) And yes, even some low voltage will produce a little esp in an arc flash, and since you can smell it even at parts per billion scales, no doubt you "sense it" but no where near an amount to be useable and it is certainly not helping your water.

 

I dont know what you are reading but it is not a chemistry book nor is it my posts.

 

And come on Mike, I told you my schools to your face at one of the meets. A big univ in Cambridge, MA and another big univ in Atlanta GA. My two degrees are in chemical engineering and physics. I have worked in the HAZMAT and Chemical industry for over 17 years including work in BKK with some fellow members. I have to do 20 hours of continuing education a year to maintain my certifications. Any thing else you want I can PM you.

 

So when you come back to anything I say with "oh you can get it in China Town" I have to laugh my butt off. But if you think you have some super duper change to the process we can make use of, I can guarantee you $$$$$$$$$. But we cant use the "I Got One in China Town" or "The Internet Says it's True" approach. We have to have hard data: real science.

 

(Oh and the Navy does not use evaporators since prob the 1980s. The current system is called a ROPU for "Reverse Osmosis Processing Unit." Here is a link: http://science.dodli...sea-transcript/ )

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The Navy does use evaporators, ships like, USNS Yano, USNS Shughart, USNS Stockham, USNS Watson (the entire Watson class, all ships built in San Diego where I worked on the new builds for three years, 8 ships in total for this class)...I was on all these ships plus many more.

 

Evaporators can produce tons of potable water, where the ROPU produces much less for the same sized equipment.

 

Interesting link.

 

Like everything, pros and cons.

ROPU, membranes can have issues, can last 3 ~ 5 years, etc.

 

Evaporators, need to have the mineral deposits jack-hammered out of them!

 

Lots of variables but I am a fan of RO water and obtain weekly amounts for my potable water needs.

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A friend of mine moved and gave me his Leveluk "kangen" water machine which was invented I believe in Japan.

It makes "yang" or water with a very very low (non acidic) PH level. Very impressive in my view but expensive item

 

The type of water on drinks is very important.

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It makes "yang" or water with a very very low (non acidic) PH level. Very impressive in my view but expensive item

 

 

One of the most technically inept statements i have ever read.

 

It is not PH but pH, the negative logarithm of the activity of the solvated hydronium ion, hence the lower case p.

 

The lower the pH the more acidic a liquid is, so a very low pH would be akin to Hydrofluoric acid, slightly above one would find Hydrochloric acid and next would be citric juices and vinegar.

 

I don't know about you but personally I prefer my water to be pH 7 on a scale of 1-14, I prefer to drink H2O rather than HCL.

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There are several ideas about drinking the "correct" pH of water. I don't have a pH meter, so no idea

the pH of the RO water that I drink.

 

I actually like things a bit sour, lime is great for many drinks! the Chinese black vinegar goes nice with

some Thai dishes that might be a bit oily.

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