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Coulter: Any Growing Interest In Soccer A Sign Of Nation's Moral Decay


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#1 waerth

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 18:31

This women is crazy, she doesn't even understand how the sport works. I am happy not everyone is this ignorant.

http://www.clarionle...decay/11372137/

If more "Americans" are watching soccer today, it's only because of the demographic switch effected by Teddy Kennedy's 1965 immigration law. I promise you: No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer. One can only hope that, in addition to learning English, these new Americans will drop their soccer fetish with time.

I've held off on writing about soccer for a decade — or about the length of the average soccer game — so as not to offend anyone. But enough is enough. Any growing interest in soccer can only be a sign of the nation's moral decay.
• Individual achievement is not a big factor in soccer. In a real sport, players fumble passes, throw bricks and drop fly balls — all in front of a crowd. When baseball players strike out, they're standing alone at the plate. But there's also individual glory in home runs, touchdowns and slam-dunks.

In soccer, the blame is dispersed and almost no one scores anyway. There are no heroes, no losers, no accountability, and no child's fragile self-esteem is bruised. There's a reason perpetually alarmed women are called "soccer moms," not "football moms."

Do they even have MVPs in soccer? Everyone just runs up and down the field and, every once in a while, a ball accidentally goes in. That's when we're supposed to go wild. I'm already asleep.

• Liberal moms like soccer because it's a sport in which athletic talent finds so little expression that girls can play with boys. No serious sport is co-ed, even at the kindergarten level.

• No other "sport" ends in as many scoreless ties as soccer. This was an actual marquee sign by the freeway in Long Beach, California, about a World Cup game last week: "2nd period, 11 minutes left, score: 0:0." Two hours later, another World Cup game was on the same screen: "1st period, 8 minutes left, score: 0:0." If Michael Jackson had treated his chronic insomnia with a tape of Argentina vs. Brazil instead of Propofol, he'd still be alive, although bored.
Even in football, by which I mean football, there are very few scoreless ties — and it's a lot harder to score when a half-dozen 300-pound bruisers are trying to crush you.

• The prospect of either personal humiliation or major injury is required to count as a sport. Most sports are sublimated warfare. As Lady Thatcher reportedly said after Germany had beaten England in some major soccer game: Don't worry. After all, twice in this century we beat them at their national game.

Baseball and basketball present a constant threat of personal disgrace. In hockey, there are three or four fights a game — and it's not a stroll on beach to be on ice with a puck flying around at 100 miles per hour. After a football game, ambulances carry off the wounded. After a soccer game, every player gets a ribbon and a juice box.

• You can't use your hands in soccer. (Thus eliminating the danger of having to catch a fly ball.) What sets man apart from the lesser beasts, besides a soul, is that we have opposable thumbs. Our hands can hold things. Here's a great idea: Let's create a game where you're not allowed to use them!

• I resent the force-fed aspect of soccer. The same people trying to push soccer on Americans are the ones demanding that we love HBO's "Girls," light-rail, Beyonce and Hillary Clinton. The number of New York Times articles claiming soccer is "catching on" is exceeded only by the ones pretending women's basketball is fascinating.
I note that we don't have to be endlessly told how exciting football is.

• It's foreign. In fact, that's the precise reason the Times is constantly hectoring Americans to love soccer. One group of sports fans with whom soccer is not "catching on" at all, is African-Americans. They remain distinctly unimpressed by the fact that the French like it.

• Soccer is like the metric system, which liberals also adore because it's European. Naturally, the metric system emerged from the French Revolution, during the brief intervals when they weren't committing mass murder by guillotine.
Despite being subjected to Chinese-style brainwashing in the public schools to use centimeters and Celsius, ask any American for the temperature, and he'll say something like "70 degrees." Ask how far Boston is from New York City, he'll say it's about 200 miles.

Liberals get angry and tell us that the metric system is more "rational" than the measurements everyone understands. This is ridiculous. An inch is the width of a man's thumb, a foot the length of his foot, a yard the length of his belt. That's easy to visualize. How do you visualize 147.2 centimeters?

• Soccer is not "catching on." Headlines this week proclaimed "Record U.S. ratings for World Cup," and we had to hear — again about the "growing popularity of soccer in the United States."

The USA-Portugal game was the blockbuster match, garnering 18.2 million viewers on ESPN. This beat the second-most watched soccer game ever: The 1999 Women's World Cup final (USA vs. China) on ABC. (In soccer, the women's games are as thrilling as the men's.)

Run-of-the-mill, regular-season Sunday Night Football games average more than 20 million viewers; NFL playoff games get 30 to 40 million viewers; and this year's Super Bowl had 111.5 million viewers.
Remember when the media tried to foist British soccer star David Beckham and his permanently camera-ready wife on us a few years ago? Their arrival in America was heralded with 24-7 news coverage. That lasted about two days. Ratings tanked. No one cared.

If more "Americans" are watching soccer today, it's only because of the demographic switch effected by Teddy Kennedy's 1965 immigration law. I promise you: No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer. One can only hope that, in addition to learning English, these new Americans will drop their soccer fetish with time.


Ann Coulter is a syndicated columnist. Contact her through her website at www.anncoulter.com.
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#2 Flashermac

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 01:05

"No American whose great-grandfather was born here is watching soccer."

My father's family emigrated to Virginia in the 1660s.  :hmmm:
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#3 BelgianBoy

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 04:57

its only soccer in the US, its football in the "real" world :)
no wonder you dont understand it :beer:
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#4 Pom Michael

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 04:58

Ann Coulter is a "polemicist"  (yes I had to look that up too).
My father was a drunk, a gambler and a womanizer. I worshiped him. Warrant Officer Paul Brenner, C.I.D. {The Generals Daughter}

#5 waerth

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 06:16

Quote

The word is derived from the Greek πολεμικός (polemikos), meaning "warlike, hostile"

Ok that declares a lot!
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#6 chocolat steve

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 09:38

I have to assume she's half joking..half. She made soccer into a political statement about immigration in America. The grandfather thingy is a reference to europeans vs. latinos.
she's Tea Party. You can't be surprised at what Tea Party people say.
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#7 Flashermac

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 02:45

Latest report I've seen is that association football is now tied with basketball for the second most sport in the US of A. I find that a bit hard to believe.
A happy childhood... is the worst possible preparation for life. - Kinky Friedman

#8 baa99

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 21:45

I thought Pele playing for the NY Cosmos got soccer popular in the USA. :soccer:

I thought Beckham playing for the LA Galaxy got soccer popular in the USA. :devil:

I thought the 1994 World Cup got soccer popular in the USA. :doah:

​I thought the 1996 Women gold medal got soccer popular in the USA. :cheerleader:

#9 บางกอกมิสซี่

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 06:06

Ann Coulter response to her article ........



PARIS -- Soccer fans have decided to prove me wrong about soccer being a fruity sport by spending the last week throwing hissy fits. This, in defense of a "sport" where the losing players cry on camera.

The massive and hysterical response to my jovial sports piece proves how right I was. Nothing explains the uniform, Borg-like caterwauling, but that soccer is a game for beret-wearers. Most of the articles attacking me are verbless strings of obscenities, their subject matter identified only in the title.

Consequently, I've decided to emulate The New York Times, which runs the exact same column, year after year, "Soccer Catches On, Take 27," by re-running mine on how excruciatingly boring soccer is.

This past week has allowed me to add several new items to my list of grievances.

Further proof that soccer is a game for girls: Since my column came out, a guy from the Paraguay team (Uruguay? Who cares?) was caught biting an opponent in a match. Not punching. Not a cross-body block. BITING! How long can it be until we see hair-pulling in soccer?

I was in Paris the night Algeria played Russia, prompting hordes of drunken Algerians to riot on the Champs Elysees, hanging out of cars, yelling and honking all night. V-Day was not celebrated with as much enthusiasm.

This was for a game that ended in a tie. Yes, a TIE -- an exhilarating 1-1 final score. I don't speak Arabic, but I assume they were shouting something like, "WE TIED! WE TIED! WE TIED!"

So in a 100-minute game, something happened two times and nothing happened 98 times.

As with Algeria's glorious 1-1 tie game against Russia, Team USA tied Portugal and lost to Germany -- and then advanced. How did the U.S. fail to win in two straight games, but advance in this apparently interminable tournament? I believe we are witnessing the implementation of that favorite rule of soccer moms: "Everybody's a winner!!!"

The reason there are so many fights among spectators at soccer games is to compensate for the tedium. Fans feel like they're watching a sport, so there ought to be excitement someplace. Even the players would rather watch the action in the stands than what's happening on the field.

Being in France does expose me to a way of life that illustrates why foreigners like soccer so much. The BBC News network proves that Europeans are incapable of being bored.

You can never tell how much time is left in soccer, which only adds to the agony. The refs keep extending the game like snippy hall monitors with their little red cards and yellow cards.

Another crucial role of the refs is to stop the games for a "heat rest." Tell that to NFL players in New Orleans or Miami, where regular-season games have reached temperatures of over 100 degrees. Two Super Bowls hit temperatures above 80 degrees -- and football players are wearing about 100 pounds of gear, not the airy frocks of soccer players.

NFL players have died of heat stroke. The only risk of death in a soccer game is when some Third World peasant goes on a murderous rampage after a bad call.

Among the least obscenity-laced attacks on my soccer column was one written by two twits who work for the Huffington Post, Nick Wing and Paige Lavender. They denounce me for my ignorance of soccer, after scouring Wikipedia for several amazing facts about the game.

I say that soccer is mind-numbing because all they do is run up and down the field? Why, Wing and Lavender are just chock-full of little statistics: Did you know that all players on a team run an average of 62 miles per game?

Now that really makes soccer interesting! Watching people run 62 miles by circumnavigating a big field all day with no scoring!

Catherine Thompson sniped in Talking Points Memo: "It's worth noting that aside from the Olympics, the World Cup is really the only occasion when an American audience gets a chance to cheer on a national -- rather than a regional -- sports team. But apparently that doesn't jibe with Coulter's vision of patriotism."

Aside from the Olympics? Yes, and aside from ABBA, Fiendens musik is the biggest Swedish rock band. Aside from that gigantic "aside from," it's still not true. Has Thompson ever heard of the Ryder Cup, the Davis Cup or the America's Cup? Apparently, those competitions don't jibe with Thompson's vision of patriotism.

Unless they're trying to impress a boy, most girls don't especially like football. Vice versa for men and ballet. I've never known either sex to care at all -- much less obsessively browbeat the opposite sex about it. Why must soccer fans get in such a snit about people who hate soccer?

Another denunciation of me came from The Washington Post's sports reporter, Mike Wise. To fully appreciate his critique of my soccer column, you must look up his photo right now.

Done? OK, in addition to calling soccer "futbol," Wise writes, "I like to think we are now deeper, more internationally sophisticated" -- which he demonstrates by squealing at me, "Get off my pitch, lady." Why, precisely, is it so vitally important that we join "an international sports community"? Doesn't this guy have something better to do than make-believe he likes soccer? Like practice his hair-pulling?
“There are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we now know we don’t know. But there are also…..”


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#10 Flashermac

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 14:46

"How did the U.S. fail to win in two straight games, but advance in this apparently interminable tournament?"  The same way that baseball and football teams sometimes advance when their rivals lose games. When your opponents' record goes down, your record in comparison may well go up.
A happy childhood... is the worst possible preparation for life. - Kinky Friedman




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