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cavanami

5 Hardest Countries For Getting Citizenship

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" Since you do not live in the UK, do you pay any taxes in the UK? do you have to fill out the tens of forms to the tax dept yearly? "

 

Boyfriend does a self assesment tax return each year, this goes back along way to a horror story of another farang he knew.

 

I don't know the exact circumstances, but apparently he worked for Texco on the oil rigs and paying taxes in America. When he returned later to the UK, the taxman said to him he had not put in a tax return for 15 years, which the tax man claimed he should have.

 

He said he paid his taxes in America. The Briish taxman was not interested in this and claimed 1.5 miillion baht, for whatever reason they came up with .. the problem was that he owned property in the UK the taxman threatened to put a charge on his house etc. Making a story short he ended up paying the money.

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Cav,

 

This is probably one of the advantages that UK has over USA, under UK Income Tax System I was allowed to file as P85, "Non UK Resident for Tax Purposes" I still have residential rights but I am out of the HMRC (your IRS) system.

 

Correct me if I am wrong but I am under the assumption that a U.S. Citizen is liable for state and federal tax if they spend one day per tax year in the U.S. Where as we Limeys are allowed 90 days per tax year in home country without incurring the wrath of the tax man, so the best of both worlds.

 

About 5 years ago I had a little battle with HMRC, I was working for SHELL in Qatar but paid through the UK and the buggers withheld UK Income Tax, HMRC are probably just like the IRS i.e. untouchable and a law unto themselves so I took the buggers to tribunal, not only was withheld taxes returned (talking $35,000 plus) HMRC also had to pay my accountants fees, custie.

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't mind paying taxes when due, in the Socialist People's Republic I cough up PIT (Personal Income Tax). Thailand is slightly strange on income tax, if in kingdom for more than 180 days per cycle one is liable but only on earnings within the current tax cycle, so as long as one can demonstrate funds used in Thailand were earned offshore more than 12 months ago there are no tax liabilities, trust me I have been under the microscope on this in the past.

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Am surprised North Korea didn't make that list.

 

Difficulty getting citizenship implies that it can be gained. I would think that the Hidden Kingdom just outright bans it.

 

 

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Cav,

 

This is probably one of the advantages that UK has over USA, under UK Income Tax System I was allowed to file as P85, "Non UK Resident for Tax Purposes" I still have residential rights but I am out of the HMRC (your IRS) system.

 

Correct me if I am wrong but I am under the assumption that a U.S. Citizen is liable for state and federal tax if they spend one day per tax year in the U.S. Where as we Limeys are allowed 90 days per tax year in home country without incurring the wrath of the tax man, so the best of both worlds.

 

About 5 years ago I had a little battle with HMRC, I was working for SHELL in Qatar but paid through the UK and the buggers withheld UK Income Tax, HMRC are probably just like the IRS i.e. untouchable and a law unto themselves so I took the buggers to tribunal, not only was withheld taxes returned (talking $35,000 plus) HMRC also had to pay my accountants fees, custie.

 

Don't get me wrong, I don't mind paying taxes when due, in the Socialist People's Republic I cough up PIT (Personal Income Tax). Thailand is slightly strange on income tax, if in kingdom for more than 180 days per cycle one is liable but only on earnings within the current tax cycle, so as long as one can demonstrate funds used in Thailand were earned offshore more than 12 months ago there are no tax liabilities, trust me I have been under the microscope on this in the past.

 

What I have found is that many countries are much better with the taxes and those of us who do not reside in their birth country.

 

Canada: the day you leave Canada, you are no longer required to pay taxes there on the foreign income earned. This is dated info, it may have changed over the past few years but the policy has always been better then the USA, IMO.

 

It has always been, for the past 20 ~ 30 years, that in order to claim the US exemption of taxes on foreign earned income, you had to be physically out of the USA 330 days in a consecutive 365 day time frame. The exemption could be pro-rated between two years if need be.

Presently the exemption is $85K (I think, don't know for sure as my tax guy handles everything) but they pile every stinking item they can in to that $85K; per diem, R&R travel, home visits, etc. That $85K shrinks to $0 real quick!

 

Thus my investigation into citizenship in other countries.

 

For me, the Thai tax rate is a bargain! a real flat tax, even at the top rate, much cheaper then the USA tax rate and all the other

taxes in the USA; property tax, state tax, city tax (many cities are doing this now), county tax, state and federal sales tax, etc.

Some of the tax rates are way over the top; 10%, 20%, etc. Rent a car at an airport in the USA and see all the taxes piled on there, shocking and not getting better!

Taxes on utilities, etc etc

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Yep the tax rates here in the States are really bad.

With my line of work, I have to buy what are called apporationed truck plates. To travel the country and then more to for travel into Canada. That runs about 1600.00 every year.

Then 550.00 in Federal highway use tax. Plus pay a tax for the miles I travel in each state and parts of Canada.

But I get tax credit if I buy enough fuel in each of those states. This has to be filed every quarter.

Then when I buy fuel there is the fuel tax included in the pump price. Plus sales tax on parts in the area I happen to need to buy parts.

Plus I have to buy what they called an international fuel tax sticker also.

Then some states if I do work inside their state. Say pick and deliver in their state with the same load they want their cut of the revenue tax I made there even though I'm not based in that state...

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My last tax returns

 

 

Joking aside this is what I do, burn fossil fuel to generate electricty, remember that next time you flip a switch and the light illuminates

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