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YimSiam

Cheering In Thai - "su Su!"

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Great Thai-speaking minds of the Board, your help please:

 

I have in recent years found myself drawn to that greatest of Thailand's national sports, the true unifier to which all Thai hearts adhere, which offers a happy way to spend my afternoons in bed in constructive and edifying pursuit: watching the Thai women's volleyball team on the tube.

 

Also, I should say that I have on occasion found myself engaged in energetic results-oriented bed-based multiple-player physical activity, where perhaps one or two of the support staff are inclined to cheer along encouragingly, urging me to that inevitable goal-line.

 

And what I hear is something like this: "Su su!" There's a kind of supportive raising of the fists that goes along with it. It sounds virtually the same as what my former Swahili-speaking assistance used to say when she had to go to the toilet - "can we stop for five minutes so I can su su?" But the meaning, I think, is different.

 

So, Thai language gurus, what is this 'su su' I think I hear? What does it mean, how is it used, and how does one write it in Thai?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

YimSiam :wink:

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Best explanation would probably be the direct translation - "Fight! Fight!"

 

สู้ = to fight, struggle

 

à¸à¸²à¸£à¸•à¹ˆà¸­à¸ªà¸¹à¹‰ = a struggle

 

 

Unless it's a boy's name. :hmmm:

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I have in recent years found myself drawn to that greatest of Thailand's national sports, the true unifier to which all Thai hearts adhere, which offers a happy way to spend my afternoons in bed in constructive and edifying pursuit: watching the Thai women's volleyball team on the tube.

 

 

 

Although unable to contribute to the susu-phenomenon I wish to add my cultural observation that rather than watching volleyball all afternoon the favorite topics seem to be movies about bad mooded Chinese knights in dramatic uniforms shouting rude words at each other and occasionally killing somebody .

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Best explanation would probably be the direct translation - "Fight! Fight!"

 

สู้ = to fight, struggle

 

à¸à¸²à¸£à¸•à¹ˆà¸­à¸ªà¸¹à¹‰ = a struggle

 

 

Unless it's a boy's name. :hmmm:

 

Grateful for your assistance - I remain hopeful that it was not a boy's name being called, but as always, one can never truly be sure in this game, in this day and age... the fact that I hear this at the ladies' volleyball matches give me confidence that s/he's no boy named Su...

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Sorry if I was not clear - the weekend afternoon things are buck naked, soaked in 100 pipers by the tumbler, invitees determined only at the very last moment, and in smoky hotel rooms cluttered by cast-off pillows and empty condoms - if I gave the impression that these are 'formal functions', my apologies... :wink:

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I think you meant - ไชโย Chaiyo

 

Hooray! ; Cheers! (ไชโย is the Thai equivalent to the English "hip hip hooray!", which you can often hear at birthday toasts and other celebrations. The format is usually like: ไช...โย (chai...yo) ไช...โย (chai...yo) ไช ไช ไช...โย โย โย (chai chai chai...yo yo yo!))

 

http://www.thai2engl...ry/1294485.html

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Is it the toast they do at formal functions? That's weird

 

You probably mean chai-yo ... ไชโย

 

British educated King Rama VI came up with it, and it now means something like cheers, hooray etc. It's usually repeated three times.

 

 

- Ah, PM beat me to it. But I have never heard anyone say "chai chai chai...yo yo yo!" :p

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Suu Suu

 

Encouragement, support not do not give up and keep on fighting ! Sometimes people use two fingers in a victory sign.

post-55327-0-58566500-1432299553_thumb.jpg

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