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Coss

The Anything Goes Youtubery Thread

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I think the VAX11/780 was the last mainframe computer built using TTL standard parts.

I learned Dartmouth BASIC on an IBM 370. The system was accessed remotely with a Teletype terminal with a paper tape printer and reader. :santa:

 

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I learned on an IBM 360 using punch cards.

I used to have a Teletype terminal with a paper tape printer and reader, way back when.

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2 hours ago, radioman said:

Thanks to Coss for the previous videos, led me down an interesting rabbit hole. Along the way was this. The guy these two YT'rs get schooled by is a real piece of work. Great explainer. Early on I learned Basic on computers with core storage, Data General Nova 2000 as I recall, timeshared so the machine was not actually on site. We had cre storage and other cards so we could see and understand how and what computers were, this was around 1975. The way he explained telemetry analysis has them seriously bothered, weeks on hands and knees with a 40 foot long piece of paper looking for a changed number.

I hadn't realised they were using discrete TTL. I know it was logic, early PLL's were TTL, seeing the way they produced the integrated circuits, between 2 and 8 transistors looks surprising familiar albeit on a gargantuan scale. About the best 45 minutes I've had this week. When the U.S really showed how to do it and what it took.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mMK6iSZsAs

 

That guy Luke, is F, F, Fantastic. I've always thought, I might have a bit of brain, but after watching that 45 minutes, I'm not so sure :) 

I really liked how they used to programme 'fate' - every contingency  

 

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Note the variability.

 

long watch

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Coss said:

Note the variability.

 

long watch

 

 

 

That's very nice. Interesting to observe the 11 year cycle in a somewhat real time change. The peak of cycle 24 around 2012-13 when you see the most activity in the form of active sunspots, the dark patches, was actually one of the lowest peaks on record, nothing like cycle 19 around 1956 or even cycles 21 and 22 in the 1980's and 90's closer in fact to the lowest known period f sun activity known as the Maunder minimum. Indications are that the next peak, cycle 25, of which you can see the first few spots right at the end of the video from late last year and early this year, will be an even lower peak.

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Yes unseasonably cold here at the moment           :snowlaugh

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