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Apple V Fbi


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The FBI demands

 

"(1)The SIF (System Information File) would bypass or disable the auto erase function whether or not enabled

 

(2) The SIF would enable the FBI to submit passwords to the SUBJECT DEVICE for testing electronically (meaning that the attempts at the passcode would not have to be manually typed on the iPhones Screen)

 

(3) The SIF would not introduce any additional delay between failed passcode attempts beyond what is incurred by the hardware on the SUBJECT DEVICE at either a government facility, or alternatively, at an Apple facility (as is done when Apple recovers data from earlier IOS versions), but passcode attempts would be electronically submitted to the device by the government, this would allow the government to conduct the passcode attempt whilst Apple retains the SIF"

 

 

 

The reason Apple upgraded the SIF was in response to Snowden's whistleblowing on NSA snooping and now the FBI are asking Apple for a backdoor key to bypass the encryption.

 

I support Apple for standing up to the FBI and saying NO, it is all about privacy

 

Thoughts?

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Dean   The fact that you forget passwords is not Apple's fault but your own, now just because Mr Dean of Middle America happens to forget his own password don't expect Apple to change their policy b

Personally I think this is all a big beat up. Kind of smoke and mirrors. I reckon ISP companies smart phone manufacturers etc have been doing deals with governments for a long time. I don't believe Ap

If only it were that simple. Governments are made up of people - and people often have their own agendas. People may be dishonest, corrupt.etc. Citing the war on terror has become this big catch-al

One thing for Tim Cook to consider is that is he could be found in contempt of a Court order. In cases where a reporter is found in contempt, the presiding Judge can, and often does, have the reporter arrested and placed in jail to see if an extended stay might change their mind. I realize that Apple has more lawyers working for them then just about any other company but would Tim Cook's convictions waiver if he had to spend a month or two in jail? Personally, having an IPhone and several IPads, I'm having to change ICloud pass codes about every other month because I forgot the current password and Apple won't let me use a password that I've used in the past year, so I have to think of obscure passwords that I have no chance of remembering two to three months later. Out of the 750 million IPhones sold, I'll bet a significant percentage of them are locked because of forgotten passwords. I admit that I'm tired of gigantic companies thumbing their noses at consumers and governments and am looking forward to seeing how the U.S. Versus Apple turns out.

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Dean

 

The fact that you forget passwords is not Apple's fault but your own, now just because Mr Dean of Middle America happens to forget his own password don't expect Apple to change their policy because maybe Mr Dean may have got hold of Mr Mekong of Bangkok's device and wish to access it, now Mr Mekong of Bangkok would be highly pissed if Apple allowed such.

 

It is quite easy to have secure passwords with are memorable, OK we are told DOB should never be used but they can be implemented as a trigger, for instance if DOB is 12/7 why not use it as a key to your favourite book (everyone knows their favourite book) Page 12 word 7 throw in a symbol "*&@£" etc. change the case of some letters and Voila, a secure memorable password.

 

Leave oneself little clues as much as a new puppy leaves gifts for you when at home, SHIT only you can sort out.

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I am in agreement that my personal privacy and security is mine and mine only and I don't need some Tom, Dick or Harriet sniffing through my used undies. It's bad enough with Big Brother and his network of cameras and whatnot; if they can't pick it up through a full body scan at the airport I don't see why they should have access to what is not theirs.

Things like OnStar that can track your car and record your speed etc (car blackbox) is already installed on most late model cars in the US and can be accessed and am not sure if it can be used as evidence in a US court do we need more of this??

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Apple did set up a system where, if you forgot your password, you have to change it, even if you can provide them with enough evidence that you are who you say (social security number, other forms of ID) and you can't have a password that you have used in the past year (I have tried passwords that I haven't used in 2 years and they were rejected). I have been sending myself emails with the User ID and password for Apple products and bank accounts and it helps. I should check into the service/business that keeps all your ID's/passwords supposedly safe but I wouldn't completely trust them, either. Obviously, privacy isn't a big concern for me. Ultimately, I don't trust Apple motives in this matter and don't trust the Government to use the information that they would get in an ethical way, so I'm just going to watch the battle unfold and see who wins.

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This is a no-brainer. The Government should have access to your smart phone in certain cases such as this, involving terrorist acts. Look at safe deposit boxes, which one may think is very private; but the Government can get access to them. If one commits a terrorist act, the government can do things like body cavity searches -- how's that for lack of privacy.

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On the one hand, yes, in extreme cases you would think the Government should, have access to your smart phone in certain cases. But as we all know there is little integrity in the Human condition and your data is not safe, not confined to exposure only in extreme circumstances. Most sys-admins can access all the data in a company's network. It's only personal integrity that keeps it private.

 

​Reality is - anything on a digital device or system is available for someone to look at. If you don't want someone to look at something, don't show them.

 

And now addressed to anyone, pearls of wisdom as handed to me by my friend the goat:

 

Photos of you dick? Don't post 'em. Top secret plans? Not for Farcebook. Details of a conspiracy? Don't text them to yourself for safekeeping. You don't have to watch TV, you can turn it off. You don't have to go into a brothel to be offended, you can do that on the pavement outside. Dislike fat women? Hand grenade. Sick of the way women in the wasteland treat you? Move to South East Asia.

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