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Straya

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Whilst I think that this is a good thing for the Aboriginals, I do have an objective thought (sometimes two, but one at the moment).

My DNA says Viking - should I be unable to be deported, from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Greenland?

Interesting possibilities if this concept gets traction, amongst indigenous rights groups.

Or more worryingly, it such traction does occur and folk from a country who reside elsewhere, then commit a crime in "adopted other country", the racists in the "adopted other country" may feel a certain pride in - sending them back to where they came from.

Yucky.

 

This could get interesting/worrying, in the future.

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Outrageous': Qantas criticised for standing down 20,000 workers without pay

Unions have demanded that any future government bailout of the airlines include money to pay workers after Australia’s national carrier, Qantas, said it will stand down two-thirds of its 30,000-strong workforce without pay and end international flights.

Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce said the standdowns were needed to survive the biggest crisis aviation has ever been through, but union leaders slammed the move for robbing from workers’ futures to prop up the airline.

Joyce said it was “survival of the fittest” in the airline industry due to the coronavirus pandemic, and “lots of airlines are going to go under”.

“Qantas will not be one of them,” he said. “One of the things we are working on is making sure we are last man standing.”

The decision comes despite a $715m rescue package for the Australian airline sector, unveiled by the government on Wednesday.

...

The Australian Manufacturing Workers’ Union national assistant secretary Glenn Thompson called on Qantas to bring forward maintenance work and give workers who are stood down 14 days special paid leave.

“Big companies with deep pockets like Qantas must support their workers in these uncertain times by providing two weeks special leave at the beginning of the standdown period,” he said.

Dan Walton, the national secretary of the biggest union at Qantas, the Australian Workers’ Union, said workers needed to be supported at least until May..

 

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/mar/19/coronavirus-qantas-and-jetstar-to-suspend-international-flights-and-stand-down-20000-workers

 

"Let them eat cake!"

https://asia.nikkei.com/Editor-s-Picks/China-up-close/Campaign-to-thank-Xi-Jinping-flatly-rejected-by-Wuhan-citizens?utm_source=paid.outbrain.com&utm_campaign=BA TH&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=E15-1&dicbo=v1-c0ee0cbb6263d6306376ddd13731e71d-00280e9c9208103b82992e13a5e43683ac-gzswknjwmjrtqljvmq4weljumzrdcllbge3tkllcmfrtcnzsmi2wmnrsha

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Mining firm Rio Tinto sorry for destroying Aboriginal caves

Mining giant Rio Tinto has apologised for blowing up 46,000-year-old Aboriginal caves in Western Australia dating back to the last Ice Age.

The Juukan Gorge caves, in the Pilbara region, were destroyed last Sunday as Rio Tinto expanded an iron ore project agreed with the authorities.

Many prehistoric artefacts have been found at the remote heritage site.

"We are sorry for the distress we have caused," said Chris Salisbury, the firm's iron ore chief executive.

"We pay our respects to the Puutu Kunti Kurrama and Pinikura People (PKKP)," he said. The PKKP are the traditional owners of the site.

"We will continue to work with the PKKP to learn from what has taken place and strengthen our partnership. As a matter of urgency, we are reviewing the plans of all other sites in the Juukan Gorge area."

Artefacts found there include a belt made from human hair, analysis of which showed a direct link going back 4,000 years between the PKKP and the prehistoric cave-dwellers.

'Devastating blow'

"Today we also recognise that a review is needed in relation to the management of heritage in Western Australia more broadly," Mr Salisbury said.

Besides iron ore, the Anglo-Australian giant has many mining interests in Australia, including bauxite for aluminium, diamonds and uranium.

Last week a PKKP representative, John Ashburton, said losing the site was a "devastating blow".

"There are less than a handful of known Aboriginal sites in Australia that are as old as this one... its importance cannot be underestimated," Reuters news agency quoted him as saying.

"Our people are deeply troubled and saddened by the destruction of these rock shelters and are grieving the loss of connection to our ancestors as well as our land."

Australian Minister for Indigenous Affairs Ken Wyatt, who is Aboriginal, said it was "incomprehensible" that the blast had gone ahead, but added that it appeared to be a "genuine mistake". State laws had failed in this instance, he said.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-52869502

 

Sorry about that, mate. But money is money!

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Australian police probe Aboriginal boy's arrest after video emerges

An Australian policeman has been placed on "restricted duties" after being filmed tripping up an Aboriginal boy, who was then pinned to the ground.

The video shows the New South Wales Police officer and two colleagues holding the boy down.

The incident ended in the boy's arrest and subsequent release, authorities said. He was taken to hospital briefly for observation.

NSW Police said its professional standards unit would investigate.

The incident happened in the Sydney suburb of Surry Hills on Monday and came to public attention after it was shared on Facebook.

Australian media reported the boy was 16 or 17.

Criticism of police treatment of indigenous Australians has ramped up this week on the back of protests about George Floyd's death in the US. Protests have been planned around Australia.

In the video, three officers are seen speaking to a group of teenagers on a brick path.

After the teenager who was later arrested says "I'll crack you in the… jaw, bro" to one officer, the boy is told to "turn around".

The officer then kicks the teenager's legs out from beneath him, causing him to fall to the ground. An onlooker is heard is saying that the boy landed on his face.

The three officers then pin the boy to the ground, arresting him.

NSW Police said the boy was released to his family after being observed for a time in hospital.

"An investigation into the circumstances surrounding the arrest is now under way by officers attached to the Professional Standards Command," a police statement said.

"The constable involved has been placed on restricted duties while this review is carried out.

"Senior officers have met with the community and local elders and will keep them appraised throughout the process."

Indigenous Australians comprise almost 30% of adult prison inmates, despite making up only about 3% of the population, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-528874

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Straya, 'merica for beginners...

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