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Don't under-estimate PM2.5 risk, doctor says

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Despite research establishing the risks associated with ultra-fine PM2.5 particulate matter, and the fact it is both odourless and invisible, many people fail to appreciate the damaging impact it has on their health, said Khate Sripratak, cardiologist and president of the Chest Disease Institute's medical staff organisation.

"It affects the health of people in all walks of life, but children, the elderly and those with congenital diseases are likely to suffer more," he said. Though there are no official figures yet, Dr Khate has noticed a distinct rise in the number of people being admitted in hospital due to PM2.5-related complaints.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), PM2.5 is particulate matter (PM) that is less than 2.5 micrometre (μm) in diameter, or about about 3% of the diameter of a human hair. PM2.5 also comprises ultra-fine particles that have a diameter of less than 0.1μm. PM that is between 0.1μm and 1μm in diameter can stay in the atmosphere for days or weeks and can be subject to long-range transboundary air transport.

These ultra-fine dust particles can have short- and long-term effects, such as respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity, aggravation of asthma, respiratory symptoms, greater mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases as well as from lung cancer.

Dr Khate also voiced concerns about Thailand's safe standard for PM2.5. WHO stipulates that the presence of PM2.5 per cubic metre (m3) of air cannot exceed 25 microgrammes per cubic metre [µg/m³] on average over 24 hours, and can be no more than 10µg/m³ on an annual average. Thailand's Pollution Control Department (PCD), meanwhile, has set a safe level of 50µg/m³ on average over 24 hours and an average of 25µg/m³ per year.

"There's no study showing that Thais have more natural resistance to pollution than other people in the world. The Pollution Control Department should make changes and launch clear measures," he said. He added that he agrees with the government's decision to halt construction, close schools and encourage people to work from home on days when the air pollution is particularly bad.

"The severity of the situation was made clear by the sheer number of schools that were forced to close recently," he said. "However, these measures cannot be imposed forever, and it is important that people protect themselves."

For those who cannot afford air purifiers and proper N95 masks, using ordinary sanitary face masks is recommended. "Being partially protected is better than not being protected at all," Dr Khate said.

Medical staff should wear face masks to boost people's awareness of the need to protect themselves, he said. "If those who are directly involved with health issues do not set an example, people might not take the issue seriously enough," he said.

https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/1843849/dont-under-estimate-pm2-5-risk-doctor-says#cxrecs_s

 

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Cough choke die.

As many on this board know and have pointed out, paper face masks are useless.

 

coff.png.ce3d2de32f0ad57773f1e112460a55a8.png

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Where is the source of the pollution? 

 

Looks like a lot of burning in Thailand - click on skip tour - this should show Thailand.  Have not heard too much about the fires - maybe the ones burning are more important than the rest of us. 

https://firms.modaps.eosdis.nasa.gov/map/#z:6;c:100.9,15.6;t:adv-points;d:2020-01-25..2020-01-26;l:firms_noaa20-viirs,firms_viirs,firms_modis_a,firms_modis_t

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That's a fascinating resource, and skipping around the world, I am amazed at the amount of fires there are. Putting aside the breathable particles, wot about global warming? This satellite detection of fires is the best case for global warming I've ever seen. Imagine if this was plastered all over the media.

On that note, it would appear that NZ has only 16 fires,  2 in the sea, one of which is White Island, the newsworthy, active Volcano and other other, is in the Taranaki Bight an area that has oil drilling rigs, so could be a flare off or similar.

So I wonder how big or small the fires are, that are detected.

And yes, wot a lot of fires in Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Burma....

Images below,  reduced in quality to make them smaller

I'm just off outside, to burn the neighbour's car to see if that shows up on the next satellite pass...

 

m1.gif.e7c587bbfb9e93899b814bf09a4f4856.gif

 

m2.thumb.gif.9d09b7148afed7849b4734ba7e853e4c.gif

 

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