Jump to content
Coss

The Covid-19 thread

Recommended Posts

JIT (Just-In-Time) supply chains have only small inventory warehoused to reduce costs. It can not respond quickly to changing demand. 

Was there any bottled water left on the shelves?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I've always wondered about JIT (Just-In-Time) supply chains, what happens when demand soars? sales are dictated by beancounter's ideas of satisfactory stock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, baa99 said:

JIT (Just-In-Time) supply chains have only small inventory warehoused to reduce costs. It can not respond quickly to changing demand. 

Was there any bottled water left on the shelves?

 

Some bottled water on the shelves. I use the local RO water machine for my drinking water as this particle RO machine has been tested to produce very clean water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cleaner hands, bluer skies: what has coronavirus done for us?

TOKYO - Deaths, economic meltdown and a planet on lockdown: the coronavirus pandemic has brought us waves of bad news, but squint and you might just see a few bright spots.

From better hygiene that has reduced other infectious diseases to people reaching out as they self-isolate, here are some slivers of silver linings during a bleak moment.

- Wash your hands! -

The message from health professionals has been clear from the start of the outbreak: wash your hands.

Everyone from celebrities to politicians has had a go at demonstrating correct technique -- including singing "Happy Birthday" twice through to make sure you scrub long enough, and hand sanitiser has flown off the shelves.

All that extra hygiene appears to be paying off, at least in some countries, including Japan, where the number of flu cases appears to be sharply down.

Japan recorded 7.21 million cases by early March -- usually around the peak of the flu season that runs until May.

That was far below figures for previous years, including the 21.04 million infections seen during the 2017/18 season.

"We estimate that one of the reasons behind it is that people are now much more aware about the need to wash hands... given the spread of the new coronavirus," Japanese health ministry official Daisha Inoue told AFP.

- Carbon curbs -

Factory shutdowns, travel bans and a squeeze on demand spell economic disaster, but it isn't all bad news for the environment.

In the four weeks to March 1, China's CO2 emissions fell 200 million tonnes, or 25 percent, compared to the same period last year, according to the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air.

That's a decline equivalent to annual CO2 emissions from Argentina, Egypt or Vietnam.

The slowdown in China also saw coal consumption at power plants there down 36 percent, and the use of oil at refineries drop by nearly as much.

Air travel is also grinding to a virtual halt, achieving at least a short-term drop-off in emissions from a highly polluting industry.

And there have been other environmental benefits, including crystal-clear waters in Venice canals usually choked with tourist-laden boats.

Unfortunately, experts say the cleaner air may be short-lived.

Once the health crisis is over, experts expect countries will double down to try to make up for lost time, with climate change concerns likely to be sidelined in a race to recover economic growth.

- Save the pangolins -

The source of the coronavirus remains in question, but early tracking focused on a market in China's Wuhan where a variety of live wildlife was on sale for consumption.

A number of animals, including bats and the highly endangered pangolin, have been identified as possible culprits for the virus.

As a result, China in February declared an immediate and "comprehensive" ban on the trade and consumption of wild animals that was welcomed by environmentalists.

Beijing implemented similar measures following the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s, but the trade and consumption of wild animals, including bats and snakes, made a comeback.

This time the ban is permanent, raising hopes that it could end the local trade in wildlife.

"I do think the government has seen the toll it takes on national economy and society is much bigger than the benefit that wild-eating business brings," said Jeff He, China director at the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

Reports linking the virus to the pangolin have also scared off would-be consumers of the scaly mammals elsewhere, with bushmeat vendors in Gabon reporting a plunge in sales.

- Apart, together -

One of the most difficult aspects of the stringent lockdowns imposed to slow the spread of the virus has been loneliness, with families and friends forced to endure weeks or even months apart.

But some people have found the measures are creating a sense of community spirit, and prompting them to make more of an effort to check in with family and reconnect with friends.

In Colombia, where a nearly three-week period of self-isolation is now in place, 43-year-old Andrea Uribe has organised everything from group exercise classes to family talent shows using video messaging programmes including Zoom.

"I have called my parents more often, I have talked to friends that I usually don't talk to... I have organised Zoom meetings with friends in multiple countries," Uribe, who works in development, told AFP.

"It is wonderful to be forced to be there for one another. It has made me more creative. It just shows that we need to be present in people's lives."

https://www.bangkokpost.com/world/1886110/cleaner-hands-bluer-skies-what-has-coronavirus-done-for-us-#cxrecs_s

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, cavanami said:

. Loooong lines at the checkout,

Ideal virus-ambience if you want to catch it. Here at most supermarket doors security-men deny entry if max number of customers inside, people outside are separated by 1,50 m markings on the floor. Purchase of toilet paper and cleaning chemicals are limited. Yesterday afternoon they caught a woman stealing toilet paper from a railcar toilet.

WHAT FOR HEAVEN´S SAKE IS THE CLUE TO HAPPYNESS IF YOU HAVE ENOUGH PAPER ON THE SHELF TO WIPE YOUR ASS FOR THE NEXT 5 YEARS  ??????????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, buffalo_bill said:

Ideal virus-ambience if you want to catch it. Here at most supermarket doors security-men deny entry if max number of customers inside, people outside are separated by 1,50 m markings on the floor. Purchase of toilet paper and cleaning chemicals are limited. Yesterday afternoon they caught a woman stealing toilet paper from a railcar toilet.

WHAT FOR HEAVEN´S SAKE IS THE CLUE TO HAPPYNESS IF YOU HAVE ENOUGH PAPER ON THE SHELF TO WIPE YOUR ASS FOR THE NEXT 5 YEARS  ??????????

Can you say, Mad Max here we come?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Would anybody be so kind to get this through to Mr Stickman! A single chance in lifetime to get stuck in your favorite bar/nightclub/Thai-massage and supposed not to leave it any more by order of her majesty´s governmant. Kia Kaha.

 

2a06941a-32e8-48f5-9a3b-df8d4cb94fa7.jpe

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bubi, we all got one of those, all of us with cellphones anyhoo.

Only essential services available. And solitary pursuits, like walking the dog.

As it happens MLG has a letter of essentialness, providing as she does, food to the plague ridden, at what is termed a supermarket. 

Actually, staffed by Lao, Thai, Khmer, Chnese and Samoan, people, it's good that they are all pulling together as Kiwis.

In yank land there'd be red necks with guns outside threatening them and wanting food at the same time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...