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Transgendered Killer now identifies as Baby


Mekong
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Yet another story from the “ You couldn’t make this shit up” file


Transgender killer who has changed from male to female now says she identifies as a baby and demands nappies, baby food and a dummy in her prison cell

A convicted killer and transgender woman has been given a dummy by prison guards after claiming she now identifies as a baby.

Sophie Eastwood, 36, who received a life sentence for strangling her cellmate with shoelaces, has also asked for nappies and baby food.

She is locked up at Polmont prison, Falkirk after killing 22-year-old Paul Algie in 2004.
 

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Transgendered should not be referred to as “She”

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That looks like a boy who is frightened of bigger boys.

I came across this "referred to as"  nonsense recently, in an email exchange with a government department here.

My apologies for posting the below:

https://www.publicservice.govt.nz/our-work/diversity-and-inclusion/pronoun-use-in-email-signatures/

.....Pronouns are words used to refer to people (for example, she/her, he/him, or they/them). An easy way to normalise the use of pronouns is to include them in your email signature.....

A few quick definitions:

  • Agender - Someone who feels neutral towards their gender and rejects the influence of gender on their person.
  • Cisgender - those who identify with the sex/gender they were assigned at birth.
  • Fa’afafine - (Samoa, American Samoa, and Tokelau), Fakaleiti or Leiti (Tonga), Fakafifine (Niue), Akava’ine (Cook Islands), Māhū (Tahiti and Hawaii), Vakasalewalewa (Fiji), and Paloma (Papa New Guinea) Fa’afafine and others listed above are some Pasifika terms used to describe cultural and gender identities. They are more or just as much about familial, genealogical, social, and cultural selfhood.
  • Gender diverse - A person whose gender identity or gender expression differs from a given society’s dominant gender roles. Gender diverse can refer to those who are transgender, nonbinary, genderqueer, or have other identities outside the gender binary.
  • Hijra - A word used in the Indian subcontinent to describe intersex people, and transgender people. This community also use the words Kinnar or Kinner to describe themselves.
  • Intersex - A term used to describe a person who may have the biological attributes of both sexes or whose biological attributes do not fit with societal assumptions about what constitutes male or female. Intersex people may identify as male, female or non-binary.
  • Nonbinary - An umbrella term for people whose gender identity doesn’t sit comfortably with ‘man’ or ‘woman’. Non-binary identities are varied and can include people who identify with some aspects of binary identities, while others reject them entirely.
  • Taahine - Taahine is similar to mixed gender, sometimes non-binary, or transgender not-otherwise specified. This speaks to the intersection of Māori and non-cisgender identities.
  • Takatāpui - Takatāpui refers to Māori who are not heterosexual and/or not cisgender. It is used both as a gender identity (similar to transgender), as an attraction or sexual orientation (similar to lesbian, gay, bi, or pansexual). It is also used as an umbrella term for all non-heterosexual and/or non-cisgender Māori people (similar to ‘Rainbow Community)’.
  • Tangata ira tane/whakatāne - Tangata ira tane roughly translates as trans man. This speaks to the intersection of both Māori and trans man identities.
  • Trans/transgender - those who identify with a different sex/gender than the one they were assigned at birth.
  • Two-Spirit – A term used in Native American communities which refers to a person who identifies as having both a masculine and a feminine spirit.
  • Whakawahine - Whakawahine roughly translates as trans woman. More literally, it translates as being or becoming, in the manner or spirit of a woman. Many Māori trans women are whakawahine, love this term, and prefer it over transgender, transsexual, or other terms. Some Māori trans women feel that ‘whaka’ or ‘to create or become’ holds an implication that they are not women, and reject this term on that basis, often preferring Taahine or Takatāpui.

What they've missed out,  is the Viking way of referring to trans and gender diverse people, which is the sound of an axe, swung forcibly to the head or neck of such person, resulting in death of said person, or a second swing in the absence of initial death..

 

 

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I sexually Identify as an Attack Helicopter. Ever since I was a boy I dreamed of soaring over the oilfields dropping hot sticky loads on disgusting foreigners. People say to me that a person being a helicopter is Impossible and I'm fucking retarded but I don't care, I'm beautiful. I'm having a plastic surgeon install rotary blades, 30 mm cannons and AMG-114 Hellfire missiles on my body. From now on I want you guys to call me "Apache" and respect my right to kill from above and kill needlessly. If you can't accept me you're a heliphobe and need to check your vehicle privilege. Thank you for being so understanding

An extract from the satirical spoof I identify as an attack helicopter

It has all gone too far, just because someone states “I identify as a/an. …” doesn’t mean we have to but the LBTGQ+ demands we do. Where does it end I identify as a Woman, I identify as a Baby, I identify as an Attack Helicopter, I identify as a Tuna Sandwich 

Bonkers, the work has just gone completely bonkers.

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11 hours ago, Coss said:

That looks like a boy who is frightened of bigger boys.

I came across this "referred to as"  nonsense recently, in an email exchange with a government department here.

My apologies for posting the below:

https://www.publicservice.govt.nz/our-work/diversity-and-inclusion/pronoun-use-in-email-signatures/

.....Pronouns are words used to refer to people (for example, she/her, he/him, or they/them). An easy way to normalise the use of pronouns is to include them in your email signature.....

A few quick definitions:

  • Agender - Someone who feels neutral towards their gender and rejects the influence of gender on their person.
  • Cisgender - those who identify with the sex/gender they were assigned at birth.
  • Fa’afafine - (Samoa, American Samoa, and Tokelau), Fakaleiti or Leiti (Tonga), Fakafifine (Niue), Akava’ine (Cook Islands), Māhū (Tahiti and Hawaii), Vakasalewalewa (Fiji), and Paloma (Papa New Guinea) Fa’afafine and others listed above are some Pasifika terms used to describe cultural and gender identities. They are more or just as much about familial, genealogical, social, and cultural selfhood.
  • Gender diverse - A person whose gender identity or gender expression differs from a given society’s dominant gender roles. Gender diverse can refer to those who are transgender, nonbinary, genderqueer, or have other identities outside the gender binary.
  • Hijra - A word used in the Indian subcontinent to describe intersex people, and transgender people. This community also use the words Kinnar or Kinner to describe themselves.
  • Intersex - A term used to describe a person who may have the biological attributes of both sexes or whose biological attributes do not fit with societal assumptions about what constitutes male or female. Intersex people may identify as male, female or non-binary.
  • Nonbinary - An umbrella term for people whose gender identity doesn’t sit comfortably with ‘man’ or ‘woman’. Non-binary identities are varied and can include people who identify with some aspects of binary identities, while others reject them entirely.
  • Taahine - Taahine is similar to mixed gender, sometimes non-binary, or transgender not-otherwise specified. This speaks to the intersection of Māori and non-cisgender identities.
  • Takatāpui - Takatāpui refers to Māori who are not heterosexual and/or not cisgender. It is used both as a gender identity (similar to transgender), as an attraction or sexual orientation (similar to lesbian, gay, bi, or pansexual). It is also used as an umbrella term for all non-heterosexual and/or non-cisgender Māori people (similar to ‘Rainbow Community)’.
  • Tangata ira tane/whakatāne - Tangata ira tane roughly translates as trans man. This speaks to the intersection of both Māori and trans man identities.
  • Trans/transgender - those who identify with a different sex/gender than the one they were assigned at birth.
  • Two-Spirit – A term used in Native American communities which refers to a person who identifies as having both a masculine and a feminine spirit.
  • Whakawahine - Whakawahine roughly translates as trans woman. More literally, it translates as being or becoming, in the manner or spirit of a woman. Many Māori trans women are whakawahine, love this term, and prefer it over transgender, transsexual, or other terms. Some Māori trans women feel that ‘whaka’ or ‘to create or become’ holds an implication that they are not women, and reject this term on that basis, often preferring Taahine or Takatāpui.

What they've missed out,  is the Viking way of referring to trans and gender diverse people, which is the sound of an axe, swung forcibly to the head or neck of such person, resulting in death of said person, or a second swing in the absence of initial death..

 

 

My grand-grand- father fought for Kaiser Wilhelm around Tonga. After thorough research of this list I identify myself as Tangata ira tane/whakatane ( nonbinary ) with two dicks .

Do I have access to the NZ social support system?

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Yes - and this will surprise you, It's quite common to encounter Tongan and Samoan people here, who have German surnames.

Sanft, Wolfgramm and Guttenbeil are some of the best known European surnames in Tonga today, with many descendants also in Samoa, New Zealand, Australia and the United States. Other names of early German settlers in Tonga which are well known throughout the region are Brähne, Hansen, Hoeft, Riechelmann, Schober, and Schulz.

https://azeusace.wordpress.com/2014/02/27/germans-in-tonga-1855-1960/

So was your grand-grand- father, a randy little bugger like you? You may have relatives down here. Some of them very big.

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We in NZ, are, shall we say, big brothers along with Australia.

With the exception of half of Samoa, named American Samoa, and the various French colonies (Tahiti Noumea etc), we're "always there" in times of disaster and unrest and so on.

Technically the Pacific Islands are independent nations, but practically they're a long way from anywhere else, with good relations and populations in NZ and Aus.

Auckland is apparently the largest Polynesian city in the world and our health care system serves all.

Tongans and Fijians are  (to my knowledge), the most famous of the then cannibal isles, though such high quality protein, was readily available across the Pacific, before the missionaries arrived to steal the lands.

I do not know whether or not the Aborigines of Australia partook, but all, across the Pacific, including Maori, did. Sensible really, why waste such good food and Mana.

This idea could solve our world population crisis.

Fascism, so,  "new boy on the block".  Eat 'em, problem solved.

Though I reckon I'd have to pick young and fat ones, for good flavour. Old tough ones, should be ground up and made into fertiliser.

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I was talking to a mate in Tokalau today

 

Old mate, the Finance and IT Minister is a great bloke, had many a good cigar sitting on the beach and learning how the fuck they sailed across the largest geographical area on the world to find specs of land regularly.

 

Between flights to Kiribati I used to stay at a hotel near the Nadi airport, was a wonderful Fiji TRanny, who like all Pacific trannies was amazingly ugly,

 

But I'd flip him $5 and all day he'd bring me what food/drink I wanted rather than me cuing up

 

Was a Hostel, I had a room overlooking the pool full of scanty clad eurpoean girl backackers

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