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Coss

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Posts posted by Coss


  1. The Personal History of David Copperfield (2019)

    A modern take on Charles Dickens's classic tale of a young orphan who is able to triumph over many obstacles. IMDB

    Perhaps a little "Through the looking glass", but still an enjoyable take on the classic.

    Dev Patel, Hugh Laurie, Tilda Swinton, Paul Whitehouse, a deliciously creepy Ben Whishaw as Uriah Heep, and others and Peter Capaldi, whom one was expecting, , would pop into a Tardis at any point during the movie.

     


  2. Yes, this is gonna be hard. Not just in Yokel land, but the rest of the lands that believe in "strength"

    Thinking back to, like ages ago, last year, I was wondering at and despising, the attack politics, that was creeping into our (NZ) country, and seemingly other places in the world. 

    We're now seeing the inevitable result of leadership brought about by such uncaring and boorish behaviour. 

    The "American Jock", "Muscle, Toughness and Blond Hair" has never been and is no longer a recipe for success.

    It's the time for Meritocracy  and no longer the time, for rule, by those with enough money to shout louder, than their opponents.


  3. Who cares what the Trumpanzees think? not many.

    Ally

    plural noun: allies

    1. a state formally cooperating with another for a military or other purpose.

    Allies are what happen when we go to war Cav, it means that should USA go to war, their allies will come and support, like we have in the past.

    But since  Drumpf, we are less inclined to do so. 

    Trade is not where Allies operate. 

     

  4. Helen Clark to co-chair WHO panel to review handling of Covid-19 pandemic

     

    ( Auntie Helen's on the case, you're in trouble now... :)  )

     

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday it was setting up an independent panel to review its handling of the Covid-19 pandemic and the response by governments worldwide.

    The announcement follows strong criticism by US President Donald Trump's administration, which accused the WHO of being "China-centric", and US formal notification on Tuesday that it was withdrawing from the UN agency in a year's time.

    Former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark and former Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf have agreed to head the panel, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.

    "The magnitude of this pandemic, which has touched virtually everyone in the world, clearly deserves a commensurate evaluation, an honest evaluation," Tedros told a virtual meeting with representatives of WHO's 194 member states.

    The co-chairs would select the other panel members, he said.

    The panel will then provide an interim report to an annual meeting of health ministers in November and present a "substantive report" next May.

    "This is not a standard report that ticks a box and is then put on a shelf to gather dust. This is something we take seriously," Tedros said.

    In May, WHO's member states adopted unanimously a resolution proposed by the European Union calling for an evaluation of the global response to the pandemic.

    Addressing Thursday's meeting, Clark said the assignment would be "exceptionally challenging".

    Johnson Sirleaf, whose country was ravaged by West Africa's Ebola outbreak, the world's worst, in 2014-2016, said she looked forward "to doing all we can to respond" to the pandemic's challenges.

    More than 12 million people are reported to have been infected by the novel coronavirus worldwide and 548,429 have died, according to a Reuters tally.

    Global health expert and former WHO head of communications Ilona Kickbusch told Reuters on Wednesday that any review had to be credible.

    "It has to be seen as a group of people that one can trust, that can start the process, and will probably involve others," she said.

    - Reuters

     

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/420890/helen-clark-to-co-chair-who-panel-to-review-handling-of-covid-19-pandemic


  5. World Health Organization (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said there would be no return to the "old normal" for the foreseeable future, especially if preventive measures were neglected.

    "Let me be blunt, too many countries are headed in the wrong direction, the virus remains public enemy number one," he told a virtual briefing from WHO headquarters in Geneva.

    "If basics are not followed, the only way this pandemic is going to go, it is going to get worse and worse and worse. But it does not have to be this way."

    Reuters' global tally, which is based on government reports, shows the disease accelerating fastest in Latin America.

    The Americas account for more than half the world's infections and half the deaths.

    Parts of the world, especially the United States with more than 3.3 million confirmed cases, are still seeing huge increases in a first wave of Covid-19 infections, while others "flatten the curve" and ease lockdowns.

    Some places such as Melbourne, and Leicester in England, are implementing a second round of shutdowns. Chinese-ruled Hong Kong, albeit with a low 1522 cases, is to tighten social distancing measures again amid growing worries about a third wave.

    The United States reported a daily global record of 69,070 new infections on 10 July. In Brazil, 1.86 million people have tested positive, including President Jair Bolsonaro, and more than 72,000 people have died.


  6. The days of showing up at a pristine national park only to be told you’d be charged 10 times what a local would pay is over, thanks to a Facebook community naming and shaming venues that continue to apply “farang prices” on foreign visitors. Now you can avoid them like the coronavirus.

    In 2PriceThailand Facebook group, expats living in Thailand are warning each other about places that demand dual pricing for foreigner regardless of their residence status, a practice openly endorsed by by state and private businesses alike, despite criticism of outright discrimination. 

    “The intention of this group is to give foreigners the ‘Right to Choose.’ We don’t think it is fair that some tourist attractions disguise the fact that they have a dual price system,” the group’s About page says. 

    “Our opinion is that if they want to overcharge foreign tourists by as much as 200% then that is their decision. But, don’t do it in a way that is both sneaky and insulting.”

    The group also says they hope to see the abolishment of the dual-pricing system in Thailand...

     

    https://www.khaosodenglish.com/culture/net/2020/07/09/expats-facebook-group-keeps-tabs-on-dual-pricing-venues/


  7. A week after another student was forcibly given an “ugly” haircut by a teacher, the Education Ministry yesterday ordered such punishment forbidden at all schools nationwide. 

    Prasert Boonruang, ministry spokesman, said Thursday that relevant agencies overseeing schools at all levels were instructed in writing that it was no longer an acceptable way to impose hairstyles on students. 

    The letter forbid teachers from punishing their students by cutting their hair against their will. It instead advised every school to give verbal warnings, suspensions, reduced behavior points or devise other corrective measures to change their behavior. The ministry also advised schools to host meetings between teachers, students and parents to reach mutual agreement on hair rules....

     

    https://coconuts.co/bangkok/news/no-really-stop-rage-cutting-thai-students-hair-education-ministry-orders/


  8. And in so much as the POTUS has the ability to 'order' someone into Prison, much like a Sheriff in a wild west town of old : this is gonna explode :

    ---

    After spending the past several weeks on New York's tony Upper East Side, Michael Cohen has found himself back in federal prison after a dispute with the government over what his lawyers say were restrictions in paperwork designed to prevent him from finishing a book about the president. 

    The form in question, a two-page document titled "Federal Location Monitoring Program Participant Agreement," had called for Cohen to abstain from communicating with members of the media — a provision that he had balked at given the pending release of his tell-all book, and one which his legal team has claimed is unusual.

    Defense attorneys and legal experts that CNN spoke with Friday said that the form appeared to be tailored to Cohen, the flamboyant former fixer to President Donald Trump, whose affinity for the press is well known. Some called it unfair. 

    "I've never seen anything like that in my years of practice where a condition was put on a person like that," said Lance Lazzaro, whose client, rapper Tekashi 6ix9ine, drew more than 2 million people to a livestream on Instagram in May -- a record for the app -- weeks after he was released early under a similar arrangement from federal prison into home confinement amid the pandemic.

    A spokesman for the Administrative Office of the US Courts, the judiciary agency that oversees the federal probation system, declined to comment on the specifics of Cohen's case, but added that no standard probation forms include language related to media contacts.

    A spokesman for the Bureau of Prisons told CNN that Cohen was taken into custody after he "declined to agree to the terms required for the program and home confinement placement."

    In May, as coronavirus continued to spread throughout the federal corrections system, Cohen walked out of New York's Otisville prison on furlough status, partway through his three-year sentence on convictions of tax evasion, lying to Congress and campaign finance violations for facilitating hush money payments to two women who alleged affairs with Trump, which the President has denied. 

    By all accounts, Cohen had returned to a mostly quiet life with his family before Thursday, when he arrived just before 11 a.m. to the lower Manhattan courthouse to negotiate the terms of his transition to home confinement with two probation officers. 

    There, alongside his lawyer, he was presented with the form. While most of the language in the document was unremarkable and standard — don't talk to convicted felons, have your family do the food shopping — the first item was troubling for Cohen and his attorney, Jeffrey Levine. The clause banned Cohen from posting on social media and prohibited him from engaging with the media — specifically listing "books." 

    "The purpose is to avoid glamorizing or bringing publicity to your status as a sentenced inmate serving a custodial term in the community," reads the document, which was obtained by CNN.

    Levine said that defense lawyers made their "objections known to the probation officers" regarding the line but had not refused to sign anything when US Marshals arrived and started to shackle Cohen.

    "I'll sign exactly what you want me to sign so that I don't have to go to jail," Cohen told the Marshals, according to another one of his lawyers, Lanny Davis, but the Marshals said it was out of their hands.

    Cohen's dishy book is said to be in its final stages of edits ahead of a September release. 

    Levine said Cohen was crestfallen. 

    "It was in his eyes," he said. "He was so shaken. The rug had been pulled out from underneath him. This is not what we came here to do today."

    Earlier this month, a photographer from the New York Post captured Cohen dining at a restaurant near his apartment. When asked if that incident was related to his detention Thursday, Levine told reporters outside the courthouse, "I would leave that to your viewers."

    Elie Honig, a former Manhattan prosecutor who now does white collar criminal defense work at the law firm Lowenstein Sandler and serves as a CNN legal analyst, said the probation office appeared to be overstepping its role.

    "At a minimum, this is overstep by the probation department. Probation's job is to protect the community, protect the probationer, and ensure the probationer doesn't flee. But it's far beyond the role of probation to limit speech in the name of policing whether its subjects are 'glamorized' in the public eye," he said. 

    The legal experts said that supervised release conditions can be tailored to an inmate, usually to fit the crime that they were convicted of. 

    Since March, the Justice Department and the Bureau of Prisons have released thousands of nonviolent and vulnerable inmates early as a result of the pandemic. Across federal and state prisons, scores of inmates have tested positive for the virus -- many of whom showed no symptoms when they were infected.

    Some inmates have been released under different legal mechanisms, which could factor into how they are supervised by the probation office after their release.

    Cohen was released under a Bureau of Prisons program after meeting certain criteria spelled out by the agency regarding the amount of time he'd served and his vulnerability to the virus. Other inmates have had their sentences reduced by federal judges. 

    The federal probation office falls under the judiciary branch. The Bureau of Prisons, which sits under the Justice Department, said that the monitoring form belonged to the probation office. 

    Lawyers for multiple other inmates released early from the federal prison system amid the pandemic said paperwork for their clients' home confinement had not included the media provision.

    "Generally when people are released early for whatever reason, they have the same restrictions in home confinement that they would have had at the bureau of prison facility," said H. Dean Steward, the lawyer who represented celebrity attorney Michael Avenatti. "It sounds like this would even be beyond that." 

    Avenatti, another media gadfly, received a temporary release from a federal jail earlier this year because he was considered at-risk for contracting Covid-19, stemming from a bout of pneumonia last year. 

    While there were no restrictions to speaking with the media as a condition for Avenatti's release, he was barred from using the internet outside of talking with his lawyers, confining him to a flip phone for communication. 

    Last month, prosecutors claimed in a court filing that Avenatti may have violated the terms of his temporary release from jail by accessing a computer connected to the internet, but he denied the allegation. A judge later modified the terms of his release to allow him to use and possess a computer that was disconnected from the internet.

     

     

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/terms-of-michael-cohens-return-to-prison-under-scrutiny/ar-BB16Be9U

    ___

    An interview, with one of Cohen's lawyers I saw, said that the "Federal Location Monitoring Program Participant Agreement," included language, to prevent Cohen's Family and Friends talking to the media.

     

     

     


  9. Next is where he pardons himself for all past and future crimes, and traffic tickets.

    ---

    And it's not so much an argument, of which president, pardoned or helped which criminal and which president, is the worst, as a reasonably calm look at Trump digging himself a deeper hole, to languish in...

    People are going to abandon support for him, not because of Stone, but because Stone is, 15 shovel-fulls of dirt, thrown out of the hole and onto voters watching the grave being dug.

     

    See

     

    Romney - 

    "Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, on Saturday criticized President Donald Trump’s decision to commute the prison sentence of Roger Stone, calling it “unprecedented, historic corruption.”

    “An American president commutes the sentence of a person convicted by a jury of lying to shield that very president,” Romney wrote on Twitter.

    Romney, a leading critic of the president, was the first prominent Republican to condemn Trump for his decision to clear Stone's 40-month prison sentence.

     

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