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dean

size of child at delivery

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Give me the link to your 10 studies. Put up or shutup. :elf:

 

If you're as clever as you make out to be.......find them yourself :mooning:

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maternitywise.org/jama_episiotomy_response.html.

http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/epcsums/epissum.htm

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/320/7227/86

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/529251

http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/episstdy.html

 

Should I continue :dunno:

 

Many organizations that do not consider episiotomies as necessary believe that it is better for a woman to tear, but is it really? Some make the argument that not every woman will tear, and that those that do may only tear a tiny bit, resulting in only one or two stitches, vs. the 10, 20 or even more needed with an episiotomy. Not every woman will tear during delivery, and so some women may have episiotomies unnecessarily.

 

There is a negative side to allowing your body to tear naturally as well. Both episiotomies and tears are considered by degrees. The most common is the second degree tear or cut, which extends halfway back to the woman's anus. The least common, but most painful, is the fourth

 

Both options today are acceptable in the medical field, and episiotomies are actually done less routinely than they used to be on pregnant women. It is best for a woman to research both options before she goes into labor so that she can choose which one she prefers while writing out her birth plan, and talking to the doctor at delivery.

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Wife could be huge from polyhydraminos-was an ultrasound done to estimate fetal birthweight? How close is the estimate to her previous deliveries? If the estimate is 8 ounces or less, vaginal delivery would still be an option. More than 8 ounces entails increased risk with vaginal delivery. How much risk can't be answered as there are too many variables-size of your wife doesn't tell size or shape of her pelvis or how the fetal head will present or how much the head will mold and so on.

Someone suggested an episiotomy would help, but all an episiotomy does is enlarge the pelvic outlet and that's not where the problem will arise with a large baby. It will arise at the bony pelvic inlet with either the head or more likely, the shoulders. Shoulder dystocias can get a little hairy.

Most obstetricians will not suggest a C-section for their convenience.

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Well, that is certainly less than 10. Two of the reports are from 2000 and 1996. The metastudy I cited was 2005. The medcare report I could not access. The other one is in agreement with my position.

 

Despite several decades of research, which

many interpret as definitive evidence against

routine (or â??liberalâ?Â) use of episiotomy, little

professional consensus has developed about the

appropriateness of routine use.

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The delivery went well. The wife went in at 10:00 A.M. and delivered a boy at 10:36 A.M. She didn't do too well yesterday after the c-section but feels better today. The boy weighs 8.5 pounds (3.865 kilos). I'm hoping that baby and wife will be able to come home by Saturday. Until then, I'll be sleeping at hospital. Thanks for your well wishes!

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