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TheCorinthian

Do You Lie To Your Doctor? Even A Little Bit About History Or Symptoms?

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When I was a Junior in high school used to smoke weed, probably 2 or 3 times a week. Almost always on school grounds (parking lot, band room, auto shop). Still made the Honor Society. :)

 

Anyway mom caught me and put a stop to that, used to sniff my breath every time I walked in the door. Though I was able to sneak it a handful of times my senior year. Went to Uni for awhile, quit and travelled, came back broke - decided to have adventure and join the military (not like it is today with Afghanistan/Iraq - I don't even know how they get kids to sign up, honestly). But I digress. Everyone told me to say no on the question asking if you ever smoked marijuana. So I did. And have ever since, every medical questionnaire or anytime it's ever come up anywhere. And even now I still might smoke out a couple times a year (ironically it's always with nurses), but I never fessed up to it with MY doctor.

 

Truth is though, some of that is just ego thinking this fact would even register as important to a physician beyond processing it as an abstract part of history. Still, I think most of us are dishonest up to a point about something or another.

 

And people have had bad experiences with physicians, always will, they're just folks like the posters here: good ones, bad ones, weird ones, cool ones, whatever.

 

BUT - and this is the important part, the meat of the matter - if someone is trying to honestly assess you - identify problematic conditions - and come up with a treatment plan - it's not difficult to see that the more complete information they have, the better. :beer:

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Unless you have Attention Deficit Disorder (and taking medication) and plan on joining the military. It turns out that you will be rejected for service. Even the recruiter usually tells the applicant to lie on his application. Also, it turns out that those mental evaluations that are given at the end of a deployment and before the start of another deployment are also ignored. At least the evaluation given just before deployment. Most serviceman, on the written part, will not put down any problems that might cause the medical supervisor to deny deployment.

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Unless you have Attention Deficit Disorder (and taking medication) and plan on joining the military. It turns out that you will be rejected for service. Even the recruiter usually tells the applicant to lie on his application. Also, it turns out that those mental evaluations that are given at the end of a deployment and before the start of another deployment are also ignored. At least the evaluation given just before deployment. Most serviceman, on the written part, will not put down any problems that might cause the medical supervisor to deny deployment.

 

 

Huh?

 

Not that I know of. I was not told to lie on mine nor were anyone that I was at MEPS or Basic with that I know of. Mental evals are also looked at to. My first deployment they even called you at home to check up on you if you were in a bad event. (I eventually asked them to stop calling.)

 

However, you last part is correct. Most will not do much or anything to avoid not shipping out with the unit. Those that do get a lot of special treatment that in my book migh just be worse than the deployment itself.

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Wasn't told to lie by recruiter, but definitely the group of guys I was going in with at the same time stressed that you didn't want to flag yourself, keep your answers generic. And do NOT say you smoked marijuana in the past. Nope, never did any illegal drugs. Went through MEPs in Chicago, and I remember one guy getting pulled out - supposedly - to take a polygraph and we didn't see him anymore.

 

The rumor going around was that he'd written down that he tried LSD, but it wasn't intentional someone slipped it on a cheeseburger he was eating. Not making it up -- of course, I have no idea if the rumor was true either.

 

The recruiter was a bit misleading though. Told him I wanted to be a ranger -- at MEPs when I signed the contract they said they wouldn't do that on a 3 year enlistment, he told me not to worry, you can just ask for the RIP program at jump school. Did Basic and 11B AIT at Ft. Benning, then jump school, come to find out there was a backlog in the RIP program and you would be put on a wait list for months.

 

By that time had orders for Europe, and of course I saw the guys in both RIP and the actual Ranger School -- they were all skinny as hell and exhausted. Some of them looked like POWs. Changed my mind. btw - I have nothing but respect for them, what they do is no joke. At that time the reality of it hit me and I did my deployment, extended a year, then ETS'd. Never saw a second of any actual combat. For you fellas that did - my hats off to you.

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and of course I saw the guys in both RIP and the actual Ranger School -- they were all skinny as hell and exhausted. Some of them looked like POWs. Changed my mind. btw - I have nothing but respect for them, what they do is no joke. At that time the reality of it hit me and I did my deployment, extended a year, then ETS'd. Never saw a second of any actual combat. For you fellas that did - my hats off to you.

 

That's the way it was when I got to Coronado.... Those guys looked dead. Was not the best thing to see on starting training!!!!

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BTW my work is not ruled by US law but mainly Western European laws

I do come into contact with US rules quite a lot, they seem de facto not much different to what I am used to (in Western Europe patient confidentiality exists mainly on paper), just a bit more bureaucratic then Europe and, yes, a little bit more serious about patient confidentiality than many other places

 

rather strict about patient confidentiality is Hong Kong

also quite strict: psychiatry in Thailand

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I never lie to my doctor, I just let my Thai girlfriend speak on my behalf. Amounts to the same thing, I suppose, but I feel less culpable.

 

YimSiam

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I have regular HIV tests the fact that I am clear is irrelivant, the fact that I have been tested could put up the price of insurance. Your medical records are not private, insurance companies, employers and the legal system can get hold of them.

 

Tip of the iceberg

 

In regard to HIV tests you are partly right, but in other regards completely wrong, concerning Germany anyway.

I have been told that if you do HIV tests regularly, your health insurance will put you in a higher risk group, but it won't get more expensive.

Generally only my doctor has all medical files, while the health insurances which pays the doctor doesn't have the details. Employers don't receive my health records neither the legal system (unless I have to to court and my medical records play a direct role...).

 

I guess Google knows much more about you medical situation than your employer.

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It's more complicated than you can think - I use Sweden as an example of european law which excludes UK and Ireland.

 

My doctor is bound to secrecy except in cases of murder or high treason. Tax Authority has the right to access of all medical journals if the purpose is to check the doctor (lawyers are the same except defence lawyers) - (if they get some information not so good about me they can tell police). If you want to have a life insurance you must sign that you give the insurance company access to all your medical journals - if not you will not get any insurance.

 

But the biggest problem is however that they are building big computer system with all citizens in a region (state) inside. Of course is access easy even for a medium hacker....

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There is so much information about each one of us

and a lot of it is available on the internet.

 

A while back I was surprised to find one person's IRS 1040 tax return

on the internet. This included his address, age, name and Social

Security number.

 

This kind of information is showing up more and more on the internet.

 

I complained to a few agencies about their practices and they claimed

there was nothing wrong in what they were doing. I told one of the

agencies (a sherrif department) that I was going to the FBI with the information.

All of a sudden they claime the information they had been putting out on the internet, etc.

was not suppose to be there.

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