Jump to content

1-Gigabit-Per-Second Google's New Internet Service


Recommended Posts

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57549436-93/google-inaugurates-its-super-high-speed-internet-service/

 

 

Google inaugurates its super-high-speed Internet service

 

Kansas City residents now get to try out the Web giant's 1-gigabit-per-second fiber optic Internet service in their homes.

 

After years in the making, Google announced today that it has started connecting people in Kansas City, Kan., to its ultra high-speed fiber-to-the-home Internet service. Acting as guinea pigs of sorts, these locals will be the first people in the world who get to test out Google's new service and decide whether it lives up to the hype.

 

When Google first announced its nationwide Google Fiber project in 2010, around 1,100 U.S. towns and cities applied to get in on the deal. When Kansas City won out, Google Access General Manager Kevin Lo said, "new high-speed infrastructure will ultimately be carrying Kansas Citians' data at speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have today."

 

Now, as the service officially kicks off, Google is making sure that its customers know what to expect. The company's representatives are going door-to-door letting people know their service is on the way and how the installation will work.

 

Here's more from a blog post by Google Fiber's service delivery director Alana Karen:

We've been working in a few homes over the last few weeks to make sure we can deliver a great experience, and along the way we've thought a lot about what "great" might mean. We want it to take the amount of time we (and you!) think it's going to take. We want to be able to explain what we're doing in easy to understand language, so it makes sense to you and it's not just tech jargon! And of course we're aiming for "one and done" -- one visit, everything working when we leave your home.

 

Google set up a Web site in August where residents interested in the service could pre-register. The company said at the time that it would prioritize construction of the network in neighborhoods -- so-called "fiberhoods" -- in which residents showed the most interest. The response was huge, within six weeks nearly 90 percent of eligible neighborhoods in Kansas City had signed up for the service.

 

The 1-gigabit-per-second service will cost customers $70 per month. The fast speeds are available for both uploads and downloads and come with 1 terabyte of data storage and a network box to deliver the service. If customers want to include Fiber TV service, the total comes out to $120, which tends to be a lot cheaper than Google's broadband competitors, such as Time Warner Cable and Comcast.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 22
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Well, there is no competition because no other company is / was willing to spend the $$$ to build the network in the first place. It's a lot like when Edison started making lightbulbs. There was no

<<Google set up a Web site in August where residents interested in the service could pre-register. The company said at the time that it would prioritize construction of the network in neighborhoods -- so-called "fiberhoods" -- in which residents showed the most interest. The response was huge, within six weeks nearly 90 percent of eligible neighborhoods in Kansas City had signed up for the service.>>

 

The hype leaves out that when started Google was saying it would follow a more "Open Access" network utilization, similar to Singapore and Hong Kong, however that has fallen by the wayside.

 

90% is a over estimation as well, craftily written, it leaves out the problem that Google was supposed to deliver access to schools etc as part of it's deal with Kansas City, however if the "Fibrehood" can't afford to sign up the required percentage of residents then their school gets left behind.

 

It's good, but could have been a lot better.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No they have a good contention plan, that won't be the issue, the problem is the creation of monopolies and blocking competition.

 

Well, there is no competition because no other company is / was willing to spend the $$$ to build the network in the first place. It's a lot like when Edison started making lightbulbs. There was no market for them and they cost a lot to make. He lost money for like 5 years. Then in the 6th he made it all back in a year.

 

Even now, no one in the US I know or have heard of is even trying to build a giga-bit network.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not quite accurate, first in Kansas to provide Gig connection, not the first broadband provider.

 

What was interesting though in Googles defence was the "opposition" had a bounty out to people to inform them whenever Google did anything.

 

Was quite interesting they paid every day people to give them information. Wasn't challenged legally either.

 

Let's face it, Google have teams going around putting up GPON strands which are them selves very easy to identify, so if the opposition couldn't work out the rate of progress without informants, they are pretty dumb.

 

Mind you, the stat of Broadband in the USA is a mess, the FCC is pissed as after Katrina there was a huge amount of flack on "Must carry services" and "Emergency Preparedness"

 

Where any of the recommendations enforced?

 

NO

 

Along comes Sandy and the telecoms infrastructure takes the same hit it did in Katrina, at least this time my guys didn't need to do the emergency connectivity and backhaul as they did after Katrina.

 

But serious questions will be raised after Jan 20.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...