Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Flashermac

8 Beers That You Should Stop Drinking Immediately

Recommended Posts

Many of us choose what we eat very carefully, or at least dedicate our minimum attention to it. But when it comes to drinks, especially alcoholic beverages, we do little to make the best decisions for our health. Which is a HUGE mistake. All the work for your body can be ruined in a weekend out. While foods and non alcoholic beverages are required to list their ingredients and are monitored by the FDA, beer does not belong in either. Alcohol industry had lobbied for years to avoid labeling its ingredients. Some to protect its recipes, but most – to hide harmful ingredients.

 

Here’s some harmful ingredients that are commonly found in beer:

 

- GMO Corn Syrup

- GMO Corn

- High Fructose Corn Syrup

- Fish Bladder

- Propylene Glycol

- Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

- Natural Flavors

- GMO Sugars

- Caramel Coloring

- Insect-Based Dyes

-Carrageenan

- BPA

- & lots more!

 

Here are the 8 beers that are commonly found in bars in United States that you should stop drinking immediately.

 

....

 

 

http://banoosh.com/blog/2014/04/03/8-beers-stop-drinking-immediately/?fb_action_ids=10152373457164540&fb_action_types=og.comments

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take issue with this kind of info (not you Flashie)

 

Ever eaten Corn? Then you've eaten the first three on the list. The fact that they may be derived from Genetically modified organisms, doesn't make them bad.

 

A carrot is a Genetically modified organism, the original version was purple, many years of traditional selective breeding allowed the genetics of the carrot to be modified to produce orange carrots, all of this, a long time ago, before the green movement.

 

Ever eaten fish soup/curry/jeow in Thaland/Laos/Cambodia ? Then 90% chance it had fish bladder in it. And Fish bladder is? a bit of skin.

 

Propylene glycol is considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and it is used as an humectant (E1520), solvent, and preservative in food and for tobacco products, ... ..... Propylene glycol is used as a solvent in many pharmaceuticals, including oral, injectable and topical formulations, such as for diazepam and lorazepam which are insoluble in water. (see Wikiwoo)

 

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) - Good sushi rice is made (in part) by boiling a bit of Kelp with white powder on it (naturally occurring MSG) with the rice. Glutamates are present in many foods naturally.

 

Natural Flavors, well hell, you wouldn't want any of those would you?

 

GMO Sugars - See argument on Genetically modified organisms above. And while we're at it, how do you genetically modify a molecule of sugar?

 

Caramel Coloring - again very scary, sugar, slightly burned, like toffee, got to be poisonous - right?

 

Insect-Based Dyes - If you ever had a cake with pink icing prior to, say, the '50s, you had red food colouring made from beetles. Half the world eat insects what's the problem?

 

Carrageenan - made from seaweed - Carrageenan is a vegetarian and vegan alternative to gelatine -http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrageenan - actually, if the Vegans like it, there could be problems with this one...

 

BPA ? Boricua Popular Army?

 

Mind you, that doesn't mean to say that we should approve of the business practises of Monsanto and the like, they're c*nts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) - Good sushi rice is made (in part) by boiling a bit of Kelp with white powder on it (naturally occurring MSG) with the rice. Glutamates are present in many foods naturally.

 

The natural product is one thing but today, it is all chemicals, missing all the important enzymes, etc. For me, I stay away from the chemical MSG...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Cav, but 'natural' and 'chemical' MSG are identical - exactly the same - indistinguishable.

 

There is no difference, except perhaps in the amount of adulterants found in the naturally occurring version, like diatoms, algae etc.

 

This is a common misperception amongst some in our societies, that a compound, or molecule, is some how different from a naturally occurring version, if it has been made by man.

 

e.g. Salt is salt (NaCl) whether it is scraped off sun heated rocks at the seaside or made from a chemical reaction in a test tube. There is no difference. If there was a difference, it wouldn't be salt.

 

The anti "man made" argument goes something like this: Some chemicals are harmful to health and living organisms, like 2,4,D and 2,4,5 T (agent orange) or concentrated industrial waste. Because they are made by man, ergo anything else made by man is bad too. Like houses, forks and underwear.

 

So to say that MSG as it occurs on Kelp, is OK, but if it comes from a factory, it is not. Is risible.

 

The concern around MSG in the diet, IMHO seems to have come from a time when it was first being produced in quantity and chefs started over-using it (notably in Chinese cuisine).

 

As with anything else, too much is too much. Just like adding too much salt to your steak. Or vinegar in your salad dressing.

 

Here in The Glorious People's Republic, they use it in everything, it's ubiquitous. And yet apart from a dose of the communisms, they are quite a healthy bunch, indeed some of the women... well that's another story.

 

I often have to tell the food vendors to put only small amounts of MSG in the food, not because I don't like it, just because they use too much.

 

Now if they were putting a harmful chemical, like cyanide (man made) in my food, that would be another story. And yet anyone who has eaten bamboo soup/salad/curry in this part of the world, has eaten trace amounts of a cyanogenic glycoside that makes cyanide in your gut -{Although the shoots (new culms that come out of the ground) of bamboo contain a toxin taxiphyllin (a cyanogenic glycoside) that produces cyanide in the gut, proper processing renders them edible.} But hey, that's naturally occurring so it's OK!

 

​Actually, I reckon there's a link between the local's tolerance of intestinal parasites and the like - and eating bamboo with the trace amounts of cyanide that get produced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if you want to add calcium to your diet, you eat chalk? I don't think so.

 

Natural comes with the enzymes, etc, chemical does not, that is the difference.

 

If I eat chemical MSG, my legs cramp and hurt like all get out. The natural product from kelp, no issues.

 

...and it is not mental (that would be another thread 555555555), as I always tell the noodle shops, "mai sai cheroot" (without MSG) and if they add the chemical MSG, I can tell that night.

 

The Japanese started using it in the "K-rations" during WWII. "Invented" by Ajinomoto company, the same you see all over LOS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if you want to add calcium to your diet, you eat chalk? I don't think so.

 

Well yes that's exactly what you're doing -

 

Composition of chalk

 

Composition of Calcium tablets

 

Natural comes with the enzymes, etc, chemical does not, that is the difference.

 

The occurrence of enzymes etc, with a chemical, does not change that chemical's molecular structure. Putting enzymes, dust and pepper in sugar just gives you sugar with enzymes, dust and pepper. The sugar itself is the same, man made or no.

 

If I eat chemical MSG, my legs cramp and hurt like all get out. The natural product from kelp, no issues.

 

I'll bet you a beer, that it's an excess of MSG you're getting, too much keeps me awake at night. The 'natural' stuff on kelp etc is present in really small quantities, so you're unlikely to get the same leg pain. To test this, you could get boxes and boxes of the kelp and scrape off all the white powder until you had about a tablespoon of it. Put that in yer Som Tam, it's about how much they put in here, way too much.

 

The Japanese started using it in the "K-rations" during WWII. "Invented" by Ajinomoto company, the same you see all over LOS.

 

Whilst you cannot 'invent' a naturally occurring chemical, you are essentially correct:

 

Kikunae Ikeda from the Tokyo Imperial University isolated glutamic acid as a new taste substance in 1908 from the seaweed Laminaria japonica, kombu, by aqueous extraction and crystallization, and named its taste "umami". He noticed that dashi, the Japanese broth of katsuobushi and kombu, had a peculiar taste that had not been scientifically described at that time and differed from sweet, salty, sour and bitter. To verify that ionized glutamate was responsible for the umami taste, Professor Ikeda studied the taste properties of many glutamate salts such as calcium, potassium, ammonium, and magnesium glutamate. All salts elicited umami in addition to a certain metallic taste due to the other minerals. Among those salts, sodium glutamate was the most soluble and palatable, and crystallized easily. Professor Ikeda named this product monosodium glutamate and submitted a patent to produce MSG. Suzuki brothers started the first commercial production of MSG in 1909 as Aji-no-moto, meaning "essence of taste" in English Wiki woo

 

 

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Professor Ikeda...smart guy, now he even has Swedish furniture stores!

 

(only kidding)

 

Good research and write up, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I checked the list and am glad to report that I do not drink any of the beers. These days I am into craft beer...Duvel and Chimay reserve are among my fave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well yes that's exactly what you're doing -

 

Composition of chalk

 

Composition of Calcium tablets

 

 

 

The occurrence of enzymes etc, with a chemical, does not change that chemical's molecular structure. Putting enzymes, dust and pepper in sugar just gives you sugar with enzymes, dust and pepper. The sugar itself is the same, man made or no.

 

 

 

I'll bet you a beer, that it's an excess of MSG you're getting, too much keeps me awake at night. The 'natural' stuff on kelp etc is present in really small quantities, so you're unlikely to get the same leg pain. To test this, you could get boxes and boxes of the kelp and scrape off all the white powder until you had about a tablespoon of it. Put that in yer Som Tam, it's about how much they put in here, way too much.

 

 

 

Whilst you cannot 'invent' a naturally occurring chemical, you are essentially correct:

 

Kikunae Ikeda from the Tokyo Imperial University isolated glutamic acid as a new taste substance in 1908 from the seaweed Laminaria japonica, kombu, by aqueous extraction and crystallization, and named its taste "umami". He noticed that dashi, the Japanese broth of katsuobushi and kombu, had a peculiar taste that had not been scientifically described at that time and differed from sweet, salty, sour and bitter. To verify that ionized glutamate was responsible for the umami taste, Professor Ikeda studied the taste properties of many glutamate salts such as calcium, potassium, ammonium, and magnesium glutamate. All salts elicited umami in addition to a certain metallic taste due to the other minerals. Among those salts, sodium glutamate was the most soluble and palatable, and crystallized easily. Professor Ikeda named this product monosodium glutamate and submitted a patent to produce MSG. Suzuki brothers started the first commercial production of MSG in 1909 as Aji-no-moto, meaning "essence of taste" in English Wiki woo

 

 

:)

 

 

All of this is true. We have not done it a lot, but from the "for fun" tests we did, we could not tell flat out from the lab GMO corn from the garden variety with flame chromatography.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...