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Looks like Theresa's government is in disarray, with handfuls of Brexit ministers resigning and even the UK's answer to Trump's hair, Boris Johnson, resigning.

 

https://www.bbc.com/...litics-44774702

 

And now Theresa has to make nice with the Donald, whom is due in a few days.

 

This is gonna be good TV, get the beer in...

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Actually BS (British Standards) are more strict than European Standards and most of EU Standards (IEC, IEEE etc) are an adaption of BS.   The UK did quite OK before we joined “Johnny Foreigner†w

I, Donald Trump, look forward to not meeting anyone in Britain, England I'd like to start by thanking myself bigly for finding the time to talk to you at this press conference. As many of you wil

I post this only to note, that Boris at least has some class :: Boris Johnson refuses to comment on 'royal showdown' Can you imagine Trump, not commenting, on something like this, if it were

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The reality is starting to sink in. The UK had a sweet deal in the EU with the rebate and various opt-outs. Now they are on the path of crashing out of the EU, because the EU will never give the UK a better deal than its member states. I expect Ireland to be the big winner.

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None of the make-Britain-great-again promoters did ever come up with a realistic idea how to proceed now. Just remembering the old days with clearing customs for every single shipment from the UK and vice versa makes me think it will kill part of the trade just for the inconvenience. I remember wise old man Stick from NZ thought Britain would be better off without the EU. Don´t think he was right.

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I don't disagree with most of this. I likely would have voted remain but I think there was just so much spite and fear rolled up in the whole thing and watching from afar it always looked like a train wreck. Unfortunately the European experiment, as partly authored by the US has evolved significantly, and not always for the best. It is easy to understand some of the British dissatisfaction with the EU. The UK joined the common market on the very clear expectation and understanding that it was a trading partnership to benefit business and not a pan European government able to dictate the shape of bananas.

 

When the dissatisfaction became palpable, in large measure a result of the freedom of movement, remember Brits ain't too keen on johnny foreigner, what! The biggest mistake was to grant a binary choice referendum, open to all. What could possibly go wrong? Well quite a lot it seems. Had there been a possibility to allow opt outs, as with the Euro, monetary union etc and prevent, the less desirable to the Brits, parts of the experiment this whole debacle would not have ensued and in truth the UK may well have been better if it had a "special relationship" with the EU from the start, as a number of countries do rather than trying to be at its core.

 

The binary political landscape in the whole of Europe probably did more to create this monster than anything, I can't just blame the EU for that though. The then UK government policy of choosing one of two equally bad options didn't help. It's over now but my thinking then, and it hasn't changed yet is that a vote on a vote would have been an appropriate first step and further that it should have excluded anyone over the age of about 75, anyone unlikely to be directly affected long term by its outcome one way or the other. A second step would have been to vote on a simple list of options, of which totally in and totally out would have been choices, but not the only choices. I think it should be clear that the result would have been very different.

 

In summary I don't think a large percentage of those who voted to leave the EU would want total separation, rather a realignment of the understanding and expectations, and requirements, of being a part of the EU. Cherry picking, yes, and why not. Much is made of the UK's wish to do just this as if it were a bad thing rather than exactly the right way to go about the whole EU project and the way some other countries form their relationships with the EU. Recognising the need for individuality and difference and making that a core part of the system would seem a far more workable arrangement. As with the way a lot of social online activity has gone these days make it a choice to opt in, not a fight to opt out.

 

Oh and I think for the most part a big driver in UK people wanting out of the EU had to do with some very simple factors. Town centres loaded with slavic drunks, national health waiting times and zero hours contracts. All of which positively exploded with the freedom of movement. It was very easy to tie those things to an EU is bad horse and watch it buckaroo! We'll keep the pretty Czech girls pulling pints at the boozer though, see cherry picking is good.

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And this news report is 5 years old!

 

White Britons are now a minority in 4 towns and cities

 

https://www.express....owns-and-cities

 

 

And from just a year and a half ago ...

 

White British population has fallen by more than HALF in just 20 years in parts of UK as country becomes ‘more segregated’

 

https://www.thesun.c...ore-segregated/

 

 

I'd sure as hell vote for Brexit, if I were a Brit. :surprised:

 

 

 

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I'd sure as hell vote for Brexit, if I were a Brit. :surprised:

 

 

 

 

Although for example India, Pakistan and Jamaica are not exactly EU and neither it´s citizens. And most EU-migrants don´t look Asian except the gipsies who are indeed a remarkable pest all over the place.

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The upshot of Empire, most of whom are long since settled in the UK and to an extent assimilated. Though there has long been an anti johhny foreigner brigade, think Enoch Powell, a divisive politician who nonetheless carried a large following of British traditionalists. The last few decades have seen them more or less accepted particularly as legislation was put in place to limit immigrant numbers. The effects of such policies are still being felt today, the windrush story exposes a lot of the goings on that few would have otherwise known about. If you ask current younger generations how they feel about fifth and sometimes sixth generation kids of immigrants they often find it hard to see them as anything other than British, which is indeed how they feel themselves. It's telling how now, after a few generations a number of these immigrant offspring are turning out to be more, well, British, than some of their more historically naturally British peers. The lines are starting to blur a bit, certainly more than when I was a youngster even.

 

I think there is a certain grudging acceptance that those who came to the UK as a result of Empire do have a certain claim and that it simply is what it is. The primary concern today is with the great hordes of Europe and the fact that once those of the wider (poorer) world have breached its borders the freedom of movement eventually let those people reach UK, the ultimate and intentional destination of a disproportionate number.

 

Oh yeah, and then there's the pikeys!

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